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American And British Influence On The Australian Pop Culture In 1950s

625 words - 3 pages

Both the American and the British has influenced Australia a lot during the 1950s. America, however, influenced them in more ways than the British. After the WWII, Australia was more dependent on the United States than Britain, therefore, their attachment grew stronger. America became Australia's largest trading partner and was dominated by American music, dance, movies, tv programs and foods. Australia was so influenced by the American culture, that it is said that none of our culture belong to us and instead a reflection of the American lifestyle.Due to the technological advances, transmission of American products and ideas into Australian Society became less complicated. Therefore, it was easier for the American to have a cultural influences on Australia.During the 1950s, both British and Australia fell under the influence of American rock n roll music. People such as Bill Haley and Elvis Presley became extremely popular. This was the generation of the teenagers and teenage rebellion. An Australian performer, Johnny O'keefe became Australia's "Elvis". American culture was helped by the development of radio, that enable them to influence foreign culture in more ways. This technological development opened a gate like a one way communication where popular culture from other country can travel worldwide.The newly formed "teenagers" followed the american teenage way of life. Teens starts to get jobs to earn some cash to spend on fashion, movies, music and other form of American entertainment. Movies based on teenage rebellion such as the wild one and rebel without a cause was very popular. On the other hand, parents thought that this was an unacceptable behaviour. Teenagers, who were non existent in previous years was known as a specific group with a specific appearance.In 1956, television was invented and radio stations relied on the teenage american music for their popularity. Playlists were dominated by a lot of American and British music. Furthermore, people were putting on American accent for advertisement to make their product look "superior".After the WWII Australia hardly made any movie worth comparing to those made by Americans. 75% of the movies...

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