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American Dream In "Death Of A Salesman"

5507 words - 22 pages

AbstractAmerican Dream is a term used by modern Americans to signify success in life as a result of hard work. There are lots of reasons why people need such a term and try to apply it in their life; the Industrial Revolution is one of the great forces that developed the American Dream. In modern times, the American Dream is seen as a possible accomplishment, as all children can go to school and get an education; it is freedom, personal rights and economic growth. However, people have difficulty in applying this term in real life. The United States has been criticized for failing to live up to the ideals that American Dream requires. However with each character in Death of a Salesman, Arthur Miller claims that blind faith in American Dream causes it to lose its real ideals. And Arthur Miller is the one who doesn't criticize the American Dream as an ideology but claims that different perceptions of the Dream and blind faith in these perceptions destroy the Dream and the captured people… So, Miller's different point of view to this issue will be issued in this project and it will be proved by the use of players' statement in the play.American Dream in Death of a SalesmanFreedom, identity, hopes…American Dream, a term coined by James Truslow Adams in his book "The Epics of America", comes out from the departure in government economics from the principles of Old World. Especially, The Industrial Revolution such as the development of big business and the increase in oil production develop the American Dream and increase the American standard of living. Of course, this standard of living is a result of success of hard work and it is for those who hope for an escape from their old life. That's why the living conditions in the old world and the hope of a better standard of living in America lead to the migration of hundreds of thousands who believe that they have a talent - if they extremely work hard, they will be successful - to the new world with new hopes. It is the possibility of getting free, achieving wealth and promoting from rags to riches in theory. However, people have difficulty in practicing this term in real life and The United States has been criticized for failing to live up to the ideals that American Dream requires. It is still an ongoing argument whether the American Dream ideals do emphasize material possession as a way of finding happiness and lack of ethics of social equality whether it is people who corrupt the American Dream and its ideals. Of course, these arguments are first started through the literature by the writers like Arthur Miller who is defined as "too outspoken and too critical of the way of life in the United States and certain assumptions that were made over there." (Pinter). Grown up in a middle class background, Miller was born in New York City on October 17, 1915. Miller's father, suffered tremendous financial loss prior to the Depression, causing the family to move to Brooklyn. After college...

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