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American Treatment Of The Indian Tribes

1080 words - 4 pages

American Treatment of the Indian Tribes
                                             
The American Indian lived a life being one with nature. In their way, they understood the ecological demands of the land and knew that if they took care of the land the land would take care of them. They possessed an untouched wisdom living in harmony with the environment. They hunted the land for buffalo, which provided food and clothing for the ages to come. In time they would almost become non existent at the hands of the “white” man. They would come to lose their land, lose the buffalo and lose their self being and their way of life.
Towards the end of the 1800s the Indian territories were reduced by about 95 percent. The U.S. government along with greedy white settlers was the main reason behind this loss of land. The government placed treaty upon treaty on the Native Americans and would not uphold to any of them. Some treaties were made to guarantee safety and permanent reserve for the Indians, but they were not followed through. In most cases the Indians were driven off the land by white settlers looking for gold or rich farmlands. The U. S. government broke some of the treaties by expanding through the promised lands looking for valuable minerals and making way for the expansion of the railways. The U.S. Government in seeking rights to control the land and its natural resources reverted to “legal” manipulation. In cases were they were met with resistance, the Army was called in to settle the score.
The relocation of the Indians from lands east of the Mississippi River to the West represents a dark phase in American history. In the first treaties signed, there were promises of stability for the Indians. One of these sagas is known as the “Trail of Tears”. This relates to the removal of the Cherokee Indians by the U.S. Army from their native lands in North Carolina, Georgia, Tennessee and Alabama. During the journey they were held in camps and then forced to travel over 1,000 miles during adverse weather. This trail led them to the Indian Territory, which is now Oklahoma. This was a catalyst towards the devastation of the American Indian culture.
The greed of the American settlers for land, led to many Indian uprising. Further treaties confined the Indians to smaller and smaller areas. The American Indians were known as migratory hunters who followed the buffalo as their main staple. This led to the belief that Indians had no attachment to any particular lands. This belief ignored the facts that some tribes harvested crops and lived in settled villages. Further push to the West to develop the land resulted in the removal of Indians from those lands.
As the Civil War closed, the Indians with the white settlers moving into their lands...

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