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An Air Of Secrecy In The Novel "Jane Eyre". Express How Secrecy Drives The Plot Of The Novel Jane Eyre.

1000 words - 4 pages

Secrets in Jane EyreClark"Often in literature, a character's success in achieving goals is tied with keeping a secret and divulging it only at the right moment, if at all." In Charlotte Bronte's novel, Jane Eyre,Edward Rochester keeps a crucial secret from society: his marriage to Bertha Mason. Rochester continues the air of deception because he deems it necessary in order to court Jane. Jane becomes aware of the truth on the day of her wedding to Rochester. She is devastated and decides to leave him. As a result of Rochester's secret and its revelation the plot significantly changes. In the novel, it was not the secret that was imperative to the plot but the consequences of the secret that affected the plot. Jane's absence positively affects Rochester's character, better preparing him to enter into an honest, healthy relationship with Jane. These changes are apparent when he humbles himself and pleads for Jane to return to him, valiantly comes to the rescue of the hidden woman he detests and allows his role of master to be altered."You never felt jealousy, did you, Miss Eyre? Of course not: I need not ask you; because you never felt love. You have both sentiments yet to experience: your soul sleeps; the shock is yet to be given which shall waken it. You think all existence lapses in as quiet a flow as that in which your youth has hitherto slid away." (Chapter 15) In this passage, Rochester treats Jane as a child devoid of real emotion and wise thought process; as if she is inferior to him. Jane does not believe she should be subjected to this treatment. Jane's absence is necessary for Rochester to fully comprehend Jane's worth and prove his sincere devotion to her in everyday life. A profound change in Rochester's character is evident immediately after Jane's decision to leave "Jane, I never meant to wound you thus. If the man who had but one little ewe lamb that was dear to him as a daughter, that ate of his bread and drank of his cup, and lay in his bosom, had by some mistake slaughtered it at the shambles, he would not have rued his bloody blunder more than I now rue mine. Will you ever forgive me?" (Ch. 27) This passage expresses Rochester's earnest humility and demonstrates his recognition that Jane deserves more than a mistress-ship with him which contrasts how he previously thought of her before she decides to leave him.After Jane departs, Rochester realizes that he has treated her poorly and silently vows to start anew and redeem himself to her. This quest is cut short however, by a fire that consumes Rochester's entire estate. Evidence of his characters growth emerges during this tragic event. "Yes, indeed was he; and he went up to the attics when all was burning above and below, and got the servants out...

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