This website uses cookies to ensure you have the best experience. Learn more

An Analysis Of Gaddis' Book, The United States And The Origins Of The Cold War, 1941–1947

711 words - 3 pages

The Cold War was a clash over ideological difference and control over
the sphere of influence. Although the Cold War is technically over; many scholars are still fascinated with the events that could have started WWIII, and its impact on U.S. foreign policy. Professor Gaddis thus wrote an impressive book which deals with the
origins and revisionist theories which gave the reader and exceptional background knowledge on the topic. However, he suggested that without accurate research materials, it would be impossible to know what took place in the Kremlin.
Gladdis brilliantly captured the atmosphere of the “Red Scare” which hindered any compromise or trust of the USSR and the United States. He carefully addresses the central issue, which highlights the difference between the U.S., the Marxist philosophy, democracy, and the open door policy of free markets. He argues how America’s isolationist past convinced policy makers and the Roosevelt and Truman administration, it was not the right course to take. He addresses Roosevelt’s speech when he said “We will not accept a world, like the postwar world, like the postwar world of the 1920’s, in which the seeds of Hitlerism can again be planted and allowed to grow. (p.11).
Gladdis argues that unlike the past, the United States would now be involved in world affairs, and would join an international security organization in order to maintain peace. It was through this concept that he reiterated the “Four Freedoms” from fear of all variants of the Wilsonian notion of self-determination, and thus avoiding the mistakes of the past. (11). He discussed how Roosevelt remained steadfast in his resolve with the USSR, and hoped that Stalin’s territorial claims could be satisfied “through a combination of plebiscite and trusteeship techniques” without violation the Atlantic Charter. (p.135). Arguably, the major tensions in the Cold War could be said to be have been U.S. democratic principles, and the need to have free access, versus the Soviet desire for buffer states such as Poland against any future threats. (p.354)
Indeed, the threat to the peace of Europe was of great concern to...

Find Another Essay On An Analysis of Gaddis' Book, The United States and the Origins of the Cold War, 1941–1947

Origins of the Islamic Religion in the United States

673 words - 3 pages Origins of the Islamic Religion in the United States The beginning of Islam in the United States can be traced to the earliest days of the slave trade. While many of the slaves brought to America practiced traditional African religions, many of the slaves from West Africa were predominately Muslim. In fact a significant number of black Africans brought to North America during the slave

"Was the United States Responsible for the Development of the Cold War"

525 words - 2 pages Was the United States Responsible For the Development of the Cold War?The events that led up to the Cold War shows that the Soviet Union, not the United States, was responsible for the development of the Cold War. There were many ideological differences between the two superpowers. The Soviet Union wanted a weak Germany and a communist government. The United States and there allies wanted a democratic government and a strong Germany. The United

Origins of Marijuana Laws in The United States

1151 words - 5 pages make exceptions for medical and industrial uses, however it placed quite heavy excise taxes on this, which effectively killed the commercial hemp industry in the United States. Anslinger's campaign against marijuana received a tremendous amount of support from William Randolph Hearst. He controlled a sizable publishing empire that included 28 newspapers, 18 magazines, and several radio stations and movie companies. He was an outspoken racist

What led to the United States Entering the Second World War, 1936-1941?

1968 words - 8 pages all major powers, including the United States, should have an equal right to trade in China . While the British acknowledged their imperialism without hesitation, the Americans have always denied theirs. This is probably because of anti-imperialist ideology and the invisible nature of its empire which made it possible to take this denial position. In order to avoid charges of economic expansionism, the American government made so much of the

The United States at Fault for the Cold War

1197 words - 5 pages From when World War II ended in 1945, all the way up to the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991, the Cold War was the center of attention of international affairs. It was a struggle between the United States and the Soviet Union. From an American view the Cold War was a mostly a war on communism. The US caused and maintained the Cold War, the US is to blame for the Cold War for disparish of the communist Soviet Union in support of the

The United States’ Relationship to Israel During the Cold War

2145 words - 9 pages losing Israel to the Soviet Union. The recognition of Israel became not just a personal agenda for Truman, but a political one for the United States during the start of the Cold War. The Soviet Union found an interest in Israel due to the political control of the Labor Party. Both the Soviet Union and the United States’ interests were battled in Israel, ultimately, choosing the United States, which forced the Soviet Union to create hostile

What were the sources of the emerging Cold War between the United States and the Soviet Union, and what key events in Germany brought the two sid

679 words - 3 pages Q8: What were the sources of the emerging Cold War between the United States and the Soviet Union, and what key events in Germany brought the two sides to the brink of confrontation? Despite having been allies during World War II, shortly afterwards in the late 1940s the United States and the Soviet Union found themselves in a new type of war. A war against one another. The period was known as The “Cold War”, which was a rivalry between the two

The Civil Liberties in Relation to the Cold War in the United States

1460 words - 6 pages and freedoms. However, liberties can be described as universal rights and freedoms. During the cold war in 1945 to 1953, the civil liberties got faced by many challenges as the citizens of the US faced and lived in a lot of terror. The Cold War in 1945 to 1953 brought about a period of tension and hostility due to the feud between the United States and the Soviet Union. The period began with the end of the Second World War. The situation acquired

Cold War vs. United States

1369 words - 5 pages strength always leads to a fear and mistrust by other countries and an arms race by Realism's way of thinking. There is no real winner or loser in an arms race. At the begin of the Cold War right after World War II, the United States was the strongest state in the world by far. It manufactured about fifty percent of goods and had about seventy percent of the gold reserves in the world at the time.(1) But fifty years later in 1996, the United States

United States' Grand Strategy during the Cold War with Emphasis on the Conflict in Vietnam

3010 words - 12 pages Introduction - Analysis of U.S. grand strategy during the Vietnam War cannot be fully understood without placing it in the context of the Cold War and the foreign policy of “containment.” In this context, details indicate that realist, liberalist, and constructivist theories all contributed to U.S. grand strategy at the time. However, more detailed analysis reveals that, while defensive realism was guiding foreign policy during this period of

Who is to blame for the Cold War, Soviet Union or United States?

1411 words - 6 pages twentieth century. Both the United States and the Soviet Union share equal responsibility for the start and continuance foe nearly a half century of the Cold War.The political relations going on in Europe during and directly after World War II had an enormous effect on laying the foundation for the Cold War. The decisions made by the United States in WWII caused tensions to rise between the U. S. and the Soviet Union. Fear of Communism in capitalist

Similar Essays

The United States And The Beginning Of The Cold War

2373 words - 9 pages The United States and the Beginning of the Cold War a) There were three cracks evident between the US-Soviet relationship. America and Russia argued about the opening of a second front against Germany. Stalin’s plans where that America and Britain invade western Europe so the Russian Red Army gets stronger and pressure on them is relieved. Roosevelt promised a second front by the time of 1942, but the delay of plans

"As Long As Stalin Was Running The Soviet Union A Cold War Was Unavoidable." (J.L Gaddis, We Now Know). Discuss This Interpretation Of The Origins And Character Of The Cold War

2078 words - 8 pages The cold war, or as John Lewis Gaddis would call it the "Long Peace" is a point in history full of intrigue. The very fact that one historian chooses to call a 'war' a period of peace, whilst for many decades previous is had been referred to as an enigma of conflicts the world hadn't seen before, and probably will never see again. The biggest problem with identifying whether or not the cold war really was instigated or inevitable because of

The Influence Of The Cold War And The Great Depression On United States Latin American Relations

931 words - 4 pages Untitled Julia Wuestefeld Grade 12 Discuss the influence of the Cold War and the Great Depression on US~LA relations. Use as examples at least two different countries in two different regions of Latin America. Wednesday March 16th, 2010 Word Count: 820 Since the Spanish-American War, the United States can be seen as an imperialist power. Using policies such as the "Big Stick" and "Gunboat Diplomacy" the

The Cold War And The United States Foreign Policy

963 words - 4 pages , the United States’ desire to keep Most Powerful Nation status influenced hypocritical actions in regards to democracy, especially in its involvement in the Middle East. The Cold War created an extremely powerful rivalry between the United States and the Soviet Union.The two nations were battling on nearly every front except actual battlefields. The fight for control over lands in the Middle East was a particularly important aspect of their