This website uses cookies to ensure you have the best experience. Learn more

An Analysis Of Irony In Henrik Ibsen's A Doll's House

765 words - 3 pages

In Henrik Ibsen's play A Doll's House, Torvald and his wife, Nora, live a middle class, conservative life with three children. Nora stays at home while Torvald works as a manager at a bank. Previously, when Torvald was sick, Nora forged her father's signature on a bond to receive money for a trip to Italy so Torvald could recover. Only Nils Krogstad, another man at the bank, and Nora's best friend, Linde, know about her terrible secret. Linde and Krogstad have also failed in society like Nora: Krogstad has performed the same act of forgery, and Linde had to work to support her family while most women stayed at home. Nora and Torvald succeed in society but their relationship fails. Ironically, Krogstad and Linde maintain a true relationship although they are both failures. They are able to be honest with each other, converse seriously, and have both been wronged by society. Therefore, they are already exposed to criticism of the world.Krogstad and Linde are able to be honest with each other while Nora and Torvald are not. Although Krogstad committed a serious crime and Linde was forced to work to support her family, both of these burdens have already been removed from them. Therefore, they are able to be open because they have no secrets left to conceal. Linde tells Krogstad she believes they must "have a complete understanding [...] which is impossible with [...] concealment and falsehood [...]" (52). Nora keeps a dangerous secret from Torvald in order for them to still appear "normal" to society. Consequently, they are not honest with each other so they cannot keep their marriage together. Nora pretends to "be someone she is not in order to fulfill the role that Torvald, her father, and society at large have expected of her" (Gillis). She is also wronged because she is led to believe "she was happy, that she was an ideal wife, and that her husband loves her" (Goonetilleke) only to find out he impulsively refuses to stay with her because she has committed a crime.Mrs. Linde and Krogstad are also able to have serious conversations. In Act III, they communicate their needs to one another and discuss how they should forget their pasts and move on to live a happy life together. They can communicate well because they do not treat each...

Find Another Essay On An Analysis of Irony in Henrik Ibsen's A Doll's House

Henrik Ibsen's "A Doll's House" Essay

2009 words - 8 pages A close study of the techniques used to portray the characters of Ibsen's A Doll's House has led me to key insights in regard to the relationship between the individual and society in 19th century Europe. Society at this time was extremely patriarchal, where men were the leading figures in the community and household. Income, status and hence reputation were far more important than anything else to the majority. Women and wives were a distant

Henrik Ibsen's A Doll's House Essay

1151 words - 5 pages A Doll’s House by Henrik Ibsen, is a play about a woman who realizes that she is worth more than she has been given credit. Her whole life she was treated like a little doll; too fragile to do anything serious, too frail to be troubled with real business. She was the wife, mother and homemaker. The only things she was perceived as capable of were running the home, raising the children and looking pretty. This was a common stereotype for

Nora's Symbolism in Henrik Ibsen's A Doll's House

1060 words - 4 pages Nora's Symbolism in Henrik Ibsen's A Doll's House       In every society power is the bringer of fortune and influence. In his play A Doll's House, Henrik Ibsen portrays, through the character of Nora, the power women are gaining in patriarchal societies. Nora, who symbolizes all women, exercises her power throughout the entire play. She cleverly manipulates the men around her while, to them, she seems to be staying in her subordinate

The Heroic Nora Helmer in Henrik Ibsen's A Doll's House

2683 words - 11 pages The Heroic Nora Helmer in Henrik Ibsen's A Doll's House   What does it mean to be a hero?  According to Webster, a hero is someone "of great strength [and] courage" who is "admired" for his or her "courage and nobility."1  Stretching this definition a bit further, I would argue that a hero is someone who uses this strength, courage, and nobility to help or save others.  Nora Helmer, in Henrik Ibsen's A Doll's House, leaves her husband

Sympathy for Nora in Henrik Ibsen's A Doll's House

2008 words - 8 pages Sympathy for Nora in Henrik Ibsen's A Doll's House In "A Doll's House," Henrik Ibsen primarily addresses issues not only relating to women in Norway, but to women embarking on twentieth century life in general. To achieve his desired effect, he employs the use of contextual dialog and places Nora as the central character, which gives her a great edge. Because of her prominent role throughout the play, she becomes familiar, and what is

Henrik Ibsen's play, "A Doll's House"

752 words - 3 pages In Henrik Ibsen's play, "A Doll's House", the central theme is Nora's rebellion against society and everything that was expected of her. Nora shows this by breaking away from all the standards and expectations that her husband and society had set up for her. In her time, women were not supposed to be independent. They were to support their husband, take care of their children, cook, clean, make everything perfect around the house, and do

Marriage Without Love in Henrik Ibsen's A Doll's House

1566 words - 6 pages Marriage Without Love in Henrik Ibsen's A Doll's House In his play, 'A Doll?s House,' Henrik Ibsen shows a marriage built only on appearances, and not love. Both Nora the wife, and Torvald the husband, pretend they are in love throughout the story. However, love should be patient and kind, and their love is anything but that. Nora treats her husband as a father figure. Her feelings towards Torvald are more about dependence than

Comparing Men's Assumptions in Susan Glaspell's Trifles and Henrik Ibsen's A Doll's House

1284 words - 5 pages Glaspell's Trifles and Henrik Ibsen's A Doll House. The assumptions made by the men lead to conflicts in both plays. The men believe that women focus on trivial matters and are incapable of intelligent thinking, while the women quietly prove the men's assumptions to be completely incorrect. Works Cited and Consulted Chamberlain, John S. Ibsen: The Open Vision. 1982. Durbach, Errol. A Doll's House: Ibsen's Myth of Transformation. Boston

Flaws Portrayed Within the Helmer Marriage in Henrik Ibsen's A Doll's House

1193 words - 5 pages Marriage is a union between two people who communicate and love each other. A love so pure and unconditional that only in death can they part. In a Doll’s House by Henrik Ibsen, Nora and Torvald appear to portray the perfect marriage. However, throughout the play flaws within the Helmer marriage are exposed: a lack of communication, love and selflessness. A relationship based on lies and play-acting; A marriage condemned by the weight of public

Challenging the conventions of marriage in Henrik Ibsen's "The Doll's House"

1523 words - 6 pages How does Ibsen challenge the conventional notions of marriage in A Doll's House?Henrik Ibsen's naturalistic drama 'A Doll's House' shocked its contemporary audience with its bold attack on the scared institution of marriage and was a savage critique on what Ibsen saw as the hypocrisies within marriage and oppression of the female spirit. In this essay I will examine how Ibsen explores the key areas in which the characters Nora and Mrs. Linde

The Lie in Ibsen's A Doll's House

1852 words - 7 pages The Lie in Ibsen's A Doll's House      An action or statement that may be considered a lie to some may, in fact, not be considered, a lie to others: it might simply be considered, omitted information. The lie might seem to have an evil intent when first heard, but the true intention behind it may have been for helpful purposes or for protection.  In Henrik Ibsen's A Doll's House, a lie was created to help and protect a loved one - yet it

Similar Essays

Henrik Ibsen's A Doll's House Essay

1283 words - 5 pages How the 1800s living dollhouse is indicative to the values of Norwegian and European society? Henrik Ibsen’s A Doll’s House plays patronage to the oppressive standards of society in Norway during the late 1800’s. The phrase, ‘doll house’, is used throughout the novel to represent the continued struggle of living one on one in a household, where quite frankly the women has to always report and work for the man of the house. In the novel, Nora

Henrik Ibsen's A Doll's House Essay

954 words - 4 pages Henrik Ibsen's A Doll's House Ibsens's play is a modern tragedy which functions on two levels, questioning the established social order of the day and presenting the death of a marriage. Both these events create a great deal of tension, and combined with the language and actions used by the characters, make the play very intense. The main cause of dramatic tension throughout the play is the way that the difference between the real

Henrik Ibsen's A Doll's House Essay

1248 words - 5 pages Henrik Ibsen's A Doll's House Plot and Sub-plots The play begins on Christmas Eve of the late 19th century, in the living room of a middle class family, the Helmers. Nora is the female lead role in this play who is treated very child-like by her husband, Torvald. He appears to have taken over her father’s role which in turn allows their marriage to be built on unstable foundations and although both parties have each other’s best

Henrik Ibsen's A Doll's House Essay

1313 words - 6 pages How did Henrik Ibsen’s A Doll’s House show the effects societal roles had on the men and women of the 19th century? The effects of the societal roles in men and women from the 19th century are displayed through the actions and morals of the characters in Henrik Ibsen’s play, A Doll’s House. The play demonstrates through its main characters the demanding norms of society. When one does not abide the Victorian society norms they are shunned