An Anyalsis Of The Poem 'the Fish' By Elizabeth Bishop

681 words - 3 pages

The poem 'The Fish' by Elizabeth Bishop is a narrative poem told in first person about the capture of a fish by an amateur fisher and the progression of the understanding for the beauty of nature.As the poem progresses the speaker moves from a sympathetic pitiful view to a respected and admiring view of the fish. The internal confrontation of the speaker is aided with vivid imagery and similes. The speaker convinces the reader alternatively of both the fish's beauty and its repulsiveness. She describes the fish as old and battered, "Brown skin hung in strips like ancient wall paper", "was like wallpaper: shapes like full brown roses stained and lost through age." The fish's skin is twice compared with wallpaper, something dull and artificial. She seems to be displeased with her own simile, repeating it twice to show her displeasure of the fish. The images that the speaker first describes the fish with, are those that are on the outside, the fish's appearance. She then seems to try to delve inside the fish seeing past his appearance, "Underneath two or three rags of green weed", she describes "The coarse with flesh packed in like feathers". Even though she may not be describing a characteristic of the fish, she still uses 'feathers' to describe his flesh, to show the fishes beauty inside. The comparison latter in the poem "Like medals with their ribbons frayed and wavering" symbolizes the fish being a decorated war-hero, the use of wavering especially gives an image of courage and pride. The progression of the fish's similes again emphasizes the speaker's progression to understanding the fish's beauty. The first similes where that of wallpaper something artificial, then to feathers, something from an animal and finally the fish is compared to a war hero, something a human could only attain. The speaker has began to realize the fish for more then just an item, more then just a "grunting weight" on the end of her line. The oxymoron...

Find Another Essay On An Anyalsis of the poem 'The Fish' by Elizabeth Bishop

Elizabeth Bishop’s “The Fish” Essay

1309 words - 5 pages “The Fish,” written by Elizabeth Bishop in 1946, is perhaps most known for its incredible use of imagery, but this analysis does not merely focus on imagery. Instead, it is based on a quote by Mark Doty from his essay “A Tremendous Fish.” In it he says, “‘The Fish’” is a carefully rendered model of an engaged mind at work” (Doty). After reading this statement, it causes one to reflect more in-depth about how the poem was written, and not just

"Filling Station" by Elizabeth Bishop and "The Jailer" by Sylvia Plath - analysis and comparison of styles

2060 words - 8 pages reconciled".A very interesting reading is offered by Renée R. Curry (White Women Writing White: H. D., Elizabeth Bishop, Sylvia Plath and Whiteness, Greenwood Press, 2000)1. She approaches the poem from the point of view of racial differences. She points out that the first stanza of "Filling Station" is full of blackness in its negative sense: dirt, disturbance, danger. The line "Careful with that match!" suggests "fear of the explosiveness of

Analysis of "Filling Station" by Elizabeth Bishop

735 words - 3 pages Poets use many literary devices to extend the meaning of poetry they are writing. It not only extends the meaning, but also gives a better overall feeling of how the poem should be interpreted. One example of literary devices is the use of imagery. Imagery is a collective sense of images given throughout the meaning of the poem itself. A great poem that shows the use of imagery is the poem by Elizabeth Bishop, Filling Station. The poem

Poetry anyalsis of the "Root Cellar"

1136 words - 5 pages Root CellarAfter reading the poem written by Theodore Roethke, entitled Root Cellar, I envisioned a dark, scary, ghost story. The poem was very understandable to read and on the surface it explains vegetables in a root cellar. The text has a literal meaning of that but the figurative language Roethke used in his poem painted a very different picture then a plan root cellar. I saw dead and living things in the dark. I believe the poem Root Cellar

"One Art" By Elizabeth Bishop

1134 words - 5 pages The ultimate sorrow of loss is deftly described in the poem "One Art" by Elizabeth Bishop. The speaker manages, through vehement self-denial of needing her loved one, to convey to an awesome extent the depth of her sense of loss without that person. The irony of this"¦"¦..The title of the poem gives away the inability to focus on anything but the person you've lost. "One Art" can be read as the one function she is able to perform

Human Interaction with Nature in the Works of Aldo Leopold and Elizabeth Bishop

1583 words - 6 pages Human Interaction with Nature in the Works of Aldo Leopold and Elizabeth Bishop The poet Elizabeth Bishop and the naturalist Aldo Leopold share a keen power of observation, a beautifully detailed manner of writing, a love for the beauty of nature, and an interest in how people interact with the natural world. Like Leopold, Bishop examines human interactions with nature on both the personal and the ecological level. On the individual level, a

"North and South" by Elizabeth Gaskell, "The Bishop Orders His Tomb" and "My Last Duchess," Robert Browning

1696 words - 7 pages of language at viewing Bessy's corpse "I never saw a dead person, No! I would rather not." However when Boucher commits suicide she takes a male responsibility of telling Bouchers widow as the men will not do so. This role reversal is indicative of her newly gained freedom of action, as she takes control of the situation by her personal competence, proving that she has become an agent for self-determination.Browning's poem "My Last Duchess" is

Loss In "One Art" by Elizabeth Bishop

704 words - 3 pages One Art by Elizabeth Bishop is a poem that explores loss in comparison to an art; however, this art is not one to be envied or sought after to succeed at. Everyone has experienced loss as the art of losing is presented as inevitably simple to master. The speaker’s attitude toward loss becomes gradually more serious as the poem progresses. Keys, having virtually no reason for emotional attachment, are mentioned in line 5 with a tone of

Fishes' Cry: An Analysis of "The Fish Are All Sick" by Anne Stevenson.

1116 words - 4 pages The poem, "The Fish Are All Sick" by Anne Stevenson, speaks a lot about the relationship between humans and nature, specifically the marine ecosystem, in the world today. Looking closely at the title of the poem, it seems that the poem is fictional - we usually hear fishes getting sick in fictional literary pieces. In addition to that, the use of the word "all" is an exaggeration of the dramatic situation of the poem - fishes are all sick. And

How does the poem "change upon change" by elizabeth barett browning relate to the concept of change

684 words - 3 pages The theme Change Upon Change by Elizabeth Barett Browning is love lost. The central character of the poem reminisces about his life five months ago. The poet uses the change in season to refer to the emotions of the character "and slow, slow as the winter snow the tears have drifted to mine eyes". As the poem continues the emotions of the character turn with the season. Change Upon Change shows using very emotive techniques, how hard it is to

Trusting The Forest Spirits By Katelin Bishop

914 words - 4 pages Back in the days when animals could talk, there lived a small village in Ireland around the skirts of a forest. The forest was murky and loathsome, so horrid that the villagers were terrorized of ever going near it. In this village lived a mother with her young daughter named Fiona. Fiona was a good natured child and was adored by the people in the village. Nevertheless she was still reckless and curious as any young tyke. After hearing such

Similar Essays

The Fish By Elizabeth Bishop Essay

886 words - 4 pages The Fish by Elizabeth Bishop      With fewer than fifty published poems Elizabeth Bishop is not one of the most prominent poets of our time. She is however well known for her use of imagery and her ability to convey the narrator?s emotions to the reader. In her vividly visual poem 'The Fish', the reader is exposed to a story wherein the use of language not only draws the reader into the story but causes the images to transcend the written

The Fish By: Elizabeth Bishop Essay

1100 words - 4 pages ultimately makes her feel sympathy for the fish. The action of looking into the fish's eyes is also powerful in that it allows the poet to personify the fish. We also discover the poet's use of an apostrophe here, which is emphasized by the poet's looking into the fish's eyes.She begins to see the fish as more and more of an equal individual. She tells us that she "admired his sullen face" (47). One of the most striking images in the poem is when she

Imagery And Diction In The Fish By Elizabeth Bishop

1304 words - 5 pages Imagery and Diction in The Fish by Elizabeth Bishop Elizabeth Bishop's use of imagery and diction in "The Fish" is meant to support the themes of observation and the deceptive nature of surface appearance. Throughout the course of the poem these themes lead the narrator to the important realization that aging (as represented by the fish) is not a negative process, and allows for a reverie for all life. Imagery and diction are the

Analyzing "One Art" By Elizabeth Bishop Is An Analytical Essay Of One Art By Elizabeth Bishop. It Looks At The Authors Meaning Of "Losing" In This Polygamous Poem.

1764 words - 7 pages Analyzing "One Art" by Elizabeth BishopIn "One Art", by Elizabeth Bishop there is a prevalent theme of Amateur vs. Skilled, Hoard vs. Reveal. Bishop appears to be the skilled individual in the poem. In the opening lines of the poem, she informs the reader that the "art of losing isn't hard to master". Losing can be an acquired skill that one can master. According to the American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, a "master" is one who