A Comparison And Contrast Of Popular Music And Lyrics In The 1950's And Today

804 words - 3 pages

Music has been known to express ideas in human emotion; music can be a release from the hectic world. But people in the 50's did not sit back and relax to the sound of "Feel It N*gga" by 50 cent. In fact, the type of songs that 50 cent sings is far from what people in the 50's used to listen to. Even though some elements of music haven't changed such as pace and sentimentality in love songs, many styles of music have evolved into more aggressive lyrics and/or very explicit and vulgar wording to fit some American cultures in the year 2006. Words like "nigger", the involvement of sexual intercourse, and the presence of violence has manifested itself into songs today, unlike the older musical generation.One of the very little unchanged aspects of music is the pace of love songs. Love songs have two kinds of pace: fast and slow. An example of a fast paced song in the 50's is the song by The Platters, "The Magic Touch". This song combined the thrill of love and a fast catchy pace. This ingenious aspect is also apparent in the song by Vanessa Carlton, "A Thousand Miles". The pace for this song is even faster than "The Magic Touch" and it is seasoned with the playing of the violin, the second fastest played instrument known to man. Another bridge between the 50's and today is the slow pace in other love songs. In the 50's, "Only You" by the Righteous Brothers, the pace is slow. This is evident due to the chord put in C minor which is a line of successive notes that are use as a calming remedy. In Celine Dion's song "My Heart Will Go On", she prolongs the final notes in order to slow the pace. The use of the flute which calms or soothes the melody of the song also aids in the slowing of the pace or tempo.Although there are some similarities the differences out-weigh them by a great deal. In the 50's, aggression was never used in song; it would be banned by the church and labeled as songs of the devil, because of the religious innocence in that time period. It would also be banned by the government because it did not uplift the mood and morale of the veterans who had suffered mentally and physically in World War II. On the other hand, today aggression is greatly...

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