A Review Of All The President's Men By Carl Bernstein And Bob Woodward.

960 words - 4 pages

Review of All the President's MenAll the President's Men, written by Carl Bernstein and Bob Woodward, is an account of the events concerning the break-in at the Watergate during Richard M. Nixon's term as President. Bernstein and Woodward have the most authority to write this book, as they uncovered most of the details. During the investigation, they were both reporters for the Washington Post. As the story was unfolding in Washington D.C., they were in a prime position to write about the investigation in great detail. No other reporter(s) did as much work on this case as they did. Although when writing, their names were often combined to form "Woodstein", they did their detective work in their own unique way. This is a classic piece of American history, and should be remembered as such.The book was written to give insight into the process of pulling the facts from the shroud of secrecy they were covered in. Although the end result is already known, the book manages to immerse the reader into the confusion and uncertainty of the time period. The book wastes no time in getting to the plot; it begins with the break-in at the headquarters of the Democratic National Convention.This book is less biased than most, due to the simple fact that it is a reporter's job to find the cold, hard facts. Reporters are paid not to be biased, but to find the true story. In All the President's Men, Bernstein and Woodward acted as detectives. They found and interrogated sources, did follow-ups on FBI investigations, and sought phone records of people connected with the case. Their efforts and ingenuity were remarkable, for back then, there were not reports of government scandals everyday in the news. A president acting in a clandestine manner was unheard of; most ordinary individuals would never suspect a conspiracy that vast to exist in their own government.The book takes place in many different areas of America. While the focal point is Washington D.C., where the major portions of the story takes place, Bernstein and Woodward go as far as Florida and California to find the answers to their questions. Since there are many times the two reporters are separated, the reader receives different reports, thus making the book confusing. However, there are summary paragraphs every few pages to keep the reader up-to-date. That was a feature I found very advantageous.Another useful feature the book contained was the "Cast of Characters". There were a lot of different people involved in the story, and unless you were alive during the Watergate scandal, it got very confusing. The cast list helped keep everything straight. It contained not only a list of names, but each person's job as well. I confused myself by thinking Maurice Stans was Hugh Sloan. Thankfully,...

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