This website uses cookies to ensure you have the best experience. Learn more

A Comparison Of The Signalman And The Red Room

1375 words - 6 pages

A Comparison of The Signalman and The Red Room

The Signalman and the Red Room are well known examples of nineteenth
century ghost stories. Write a critical comparison of these two
stories. What do you consider to be their strengths and which of the
stories do you enjoy the most.

Charles Dickens and H.G. Wells were both living during the Victorian
era. The many radical changes in this era tainted their writing. Both
Wells and Dickens were against the social situation at the time, this
is evident in their writings. Although Britain had many colonies,
wealth was not circulating amongst its people. This made life
unbearable for some. Dickens and Wells spoke out against this and were
concerned with the fate of human society. Dickens wrote many books
plays and pamphlets, as well as giving talks, on the effect of an
unjust society. Wells, also thought about the effect of an unjust
society, but was also interested in science.

In The Signalman much of the story takes place outside, this outside
atmosphere is embellished with plenty of detail giving it a hesitant
environment. In the Red Room the action is all inside the castle, so
the detail is described in the corridor through to the room itself.
The Signalman has a cold damp effect due to the settings. This
compliments the storyline perfectly. The "jagged stone" walls became
"oozier and wetter" as the visitor descends to the signalman. The
"dripping-wet walls" give an impression of clamminess and bitter cold.
The area where the signalman spent most of his time had "little
sunlight" it was also very gloomy. The wind ran through the tunnel and
gives the impression of leaving "the natural world", thus the weather
gives an unwelcoming impression of this dark depressing place.

In the Red Room the action is all inside the castle, so the detail is
described in the corridor through to the room itself. In the Red Room
the visitor is travelling through a corridor and then into a room. The
corridor is "shadowy" and the visitor has to move his candle "from
side to side" he does this to see what is before him on either side,
before actually moving on. This creates an atmosphere of tension even
before he reaches the Red Room. When the visitor enters the red room
he notices a "shadow in the alcove", this alarms him and he does not
feel quite alone with the presence of the shadow. To "reassure myself"
he places candles in various places to block all shadows from forming.

In The Signalman Dickens uses large sentences so the result is
therefore trying to create an effect of ongoing images in the mind of
the visitor and in the setting of the place. Dickens also uses long
sentences in The Signalman, when he is describing the setting. This is
because he is trying to create an image in the readers mind; this is
achieved by long descriptions. An array...

Find Another Essay On A Comparison of The Signalman and The Red Room

The Red Room and The Signalman

2977 words - 12 pages Gothic stories - The Red Room and The Signalman how do the authors create tension and an atmosphere of fear? Gothic Stories ============== In this essay I will be discussing a number of things. Firstly, I will be discussing what Gothic writing is and then I will move the discussion towards the subject, which my essay consists of, 'in the novels "The Red Room" and "The Signalman" how do the authors create tension and an atmosphere of

A Comparison of The Signalman by Charles Dickens, The Red Room by H.G. Wells and The Monkey's Paw by W.W. Jacobs

2634 words - 11 pages A Comparison of The Signalman by Charles Dickens, The Red Room by H.G. Wells and The Monkey's Paw by W.W. Jacobs Works Cited Missing All these stories were written in the Victorian era and ghost stories were popular. The reasons that ghost stories were popular was because

The Use of Language in The Red Room and The Signalman

2221 words - 9 pages helpful as they give a good insight into what something looks like. Tension was successfully created in the red room as it used repetition. It really helped as it made the reader want to know what was going to happen, as it was repeated so many times. In the signalman tension and suspense was created with the use of adjectives. Objects are the railway station were given great detail so the reader can get a good picture of what things looked like.

The Signalman and the Red Room are well known examples of nineteenth

639 words - 3 pages The Signalman and the Red Room are well known examples of nineteenth century ghost stories. Write a critical comparison of these two stories. A critical comparison of "The Signalman" and "the Red Room" which are well known examples of nineteenth century ghost stories The Signalman" and "the Red Room" are well known examples of nineteenth century ghost stories. Write a critical comparison of these two stories. "The Signalman" by

The Element of Fear: Dickens´ The Signalman and Wells´ Red Room

2097 words - 8 pages Charles Dickens’ ‘The Signalman,’ and H.G Wells’ ‘Red Room’ are both short stories written to grip readers through the element of fear. Both tales were written near the end of the Victorian era, during Queen Victoria’s reign. Victorian Britain had a liking for literature, including short stories. Short stories were idyllic because they were a source of instant entertainment, the type required in technologically withdrawn times. People were also

Comparison of The Red Room and Farthing House

1948 words - 8 pages Comparison of The Red Room and Farthing House 'The Red Room' and 'Farthing House' are both ghost stories and fit into the Gothic mysteries. Red Room and Farthing House are written by different authors, at different times. Farthing House was written in the 20th centaury and uses more modern language. Red Room was written in the

A Comparison of A Vendetta by Guy de Maupassant and The Red Room by H.G. Wells

1517 words - 6 pages A Comparison of A Vendetta by Guy de Maupassant and The Red Room by H.G. Wells I am aiming to look at the differences and similarities of two writer's methods of creating tension in their stories. The two stories I am looking at are 'A Vendetta' by Guy de Maupassant and 'The

Analysis of The Red Room by H.G Wells, The Signalman by Charles Dickens, and An Arrest by Ambrose Bierce

810 words - 3 pages Analysis of The Red Room by H.G Wells, The Signalman by Charles Dickens, and An Arrest by Ambrose Bierce The Victorian era, spanning from 1830-1901, was a period of dramatic change with the rapid extension of colonialism through Africa, Asia and the West Indies making England a world power and relocating the perceived centre of western civilisation to London. Advances in industry, science, technology, architecture, medicine

The Signalman, The Red Room and The Man with the Twisted Lip

3029 words - 12 pages , language and imagery. Whether or not these techniques are successful is a different story, but definitely pose as a solution for the ending of each story. Some investigation on the historical, social and literary background can help to show why each writer made his particular choice of setting. The stories, “The Red Room” written by H.G Wells, “The Signalman” by Charles Dickens and “The Man with the Twisted Lip” by Conan Doyle were

The Language in The Red Room by H G Wells and The Signalman by Charles Dickens

911 words - 4 pages The Language in The Red Room by H G Wells and The Signalman by Charles Dickens Throughout, The Signalman has suspense and the tension is gripping, as the author, Dickens, has used exceedingly good description in the language and the setting is just perfect. Dickens had an advantage when writing this story as there were similarities between himself and some of the characters; since he had been involved in a train

The Signalman by Charles Dickens and The Red Room by H G Wells

2245 words - 9 pages wants to enter 'The Red Room'. He believes the spirits of his predecessors are there. He is warned not to enter but does and becomes scared of 'fear'. 'The Signalman' is about a man who meets a signalman who is having trouble with life. He claims to have premonitions of future events. The man is shocked when he realises that the signalman was seeing future events that led to his own death. The 'Signalman' is set in a deep cutting adjacent

Similar Essays

A Comparison Of The Red Room And The Signalman

889 words - 4 pages A Comparison Between The Red Room and The Signalman These two stories, though different, have in common their writers intentions which is to keep the reader in suspense. We can see this in many places in the stories, and an example of this relates to the settings and surroundings throughout. The Victorians were very interested in Gothic Literature and this is shown especially in the ‘Red Room’, where Wells borrowed applications such as

Comparison Of The Red Room, The Signalman And The Ostler

3766 words - 15 pages Comparison of The Red Room, The Signalman and The Ostler A gothic story is a type of romantic fiction that existed in English Literature in the last third of the 18th century and the first two decades of the 19th century, the setting for which was usually a ruined gothic castle of Abbey. The gothic novel or gothic romance emphasised mystery and horror and was filled with ghost haunting rooms, underground passages, and

Comparison Of The Red Room And The Signalman

896 words - 4 pages Comparison of The Red Room and The Signalman. The two stories we were asked to compare had one common themes which were the building of fear and suspense throughout. One clear difference between the stories was the function of fear in the stories. In the 'The Red Room' the author does not only use fear as a means of evolving the story but also places it at the centre of the story. 'The Signalman' uses fear of the supernatural as a

A Comparison Between 'the Signalman' By Charles Dickens And 'the Red Room' By H.G. Wells

3646 words - 15 pages A Comparison between 'The Signalman' by Charles Dickens and 'The Red Room' by H.G. Wells How do Dickens and Wells create a sinister and supernatural atmosphere in the opening of The Signalman and the Red Room? Dickens and Wells both create a sinister and supernatural