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An Unlikely Family In The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn, By Mark Twain

750 words - 3 pages

In The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain, Huck and Jim evolve into a complex yet heartwarming duo. Though originally separated by race and culture, the two come together as close friends.
Huck initially views Jim as a worthless piece of property adding to his burden of running away. Before meeting Jim, Huck's family and friends set his prejudice against blacks, saying“but when they told me there was a State in this country where they'd let that ****** vote, I drawed out. I says I'll never vote agin” (35). Huck's childhood among rich white plantation owners, whom have no value for African American lives, contributes towards Huck's racism against Jim. Through Huck, Twain details how racist values have survived through history by passing through family. Unlike other children, however, Huck consistently upholds an independent personality with a swift desire to not resemble others. Early in Jim and Huck's travels, Jim criticizes Huck's cruel demeanor towards him, thus invoking the thought: “It was fifteen minutes before I could work myself up to go and humble myself to a nigger.” (Ch 15.8.) Huck's current disposition summarizes how southern whites viewed African Americans as an inferior race during the era. Despite Huck's revulsion to Jim, Jim's tolerance against Huck's discrimination testifies how blacks survived constant abuse from their owners, though they did not have a choice. Additionally, Jim indirectly parents Huck by scolding him, filling the absence of Pap or the Widow's presence. In contest with disliking Jim, Huck feels guilty for helping Jim run away from his rightful owner in Miss Watson. (Ch 16). Helping Jim run away from slavery slightly validates Huck's remorse due to it being a crime. Though Huck has opportunities, he curiously refuses to turn Jim in for a cash reward. Huck has no friends with him, thus Jim fills his need for companionship. Among racial insensitivity and ethics, Huck finds himself at a crossroads on what to do with Jim as he merely allows him to tag along.
Despite mistrusting Jim, Huck eventually depends on him for support and companionship as does Jim vice versa. Upon entering Cairo, Jim exclaims that...

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