Analysis Of The Last Scene Of Film Frankenstein By Kenneth Branagh

1416 words - 6 pages

Analysis of the Last Scene of Film Frankenstein by Kenneth Branagh

The monster that Victor Frankenstein created to stop death has
destroyed him emotionally. This monster has killed all that Victor
ever loved. He killed his little brother, his wife, his father, and
his housemaid. Wanting vengeance Victor follows the monster north in
an unwavering pursuit. All he wants to do is to destroy the monster.
But the monster soon kills him by torturing him while on the run.
Victor dies from exhaustion almost immediately after he finishes
telling Captain Walton his frightening tale. His final words are ''I'm
tired, so very tired.'' The monster appears on the scene and is
miserable at the death of his "father". The monster is visibly
miserable and he shows this by weeping over the corpse of Frankenstein
and then by vowing to commit suicide. This increases the drama of this
final scene.

This final scene of the film contrasts with the dramatic scene of the
death of Elizabeth where the fire and the fast and heavily scored
music increases the drama. The darkness of the building placed with
the orangey-yellow glare of the fire as Elizabeth runs through the
Frankenstein mansion towards the camera creates a commotion and
increases the excitement. The scene suddenly changes from this
dramatic scene to a lacklustre landscape of the Arctic; the light
change alters the mood as we come to the conclusion of this sad tragic
tale of an experiment gone wrong. The camera becomes static as we hear
a voice over of Frankenstein's voice as we reach a dramatic climax
with the death of Frankenstein. The music becomes slow and serious and
as the film reaches the point in which Frankenstein dies. At this
point we become filled with sympathy because the creature that he
created as an experiment to try and create life has taken his life.
The close up on Frankenstein as he speaks his final words focuses all
our attention on him. We suddenly have a feeling of anger towards the
monster as he has just tortured a suffering man to death. The
situation here is that creator has been destroyed by his creation.

The film then tries to make us feel sorry for the monster. This is
shown during the scene in which Captain Walton comes down into his
cabin shortly after Frankenstein's death after hearing a groan from
below deck and finds the creature weeping over the corpse of the
recently deceased scientist. Walton asks the creature what he is and
he answers with "he was my father." This reply starts to build up our
sympathy for the monster as he has just lost his "father". This scene
tries to increase the sympathy successfully when the creature also
says "he never gave me a name." This adds to the sympathy by making us
feel guilty that this creature towards whom we first felt anger
doesn't even have a name. At this point the...

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