Analysis Of A Valediction Forbidding Mourning By John Donne

1230 words - 5 pages

Analysis of A Valediction Forbidding Mourning by John Donne

In "A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning," John Donne uses many metaphors and images to convince his lover that even though they are going to be apart, their love will remain untainted. The prefix un- meaning to do the opposite of or is also used to reverse the meaning of a word. The definition of tainted is to be contaminated or to be touched or affected slightly with something bad. In short, untainted means to remain the same without being corrupted by outside influences. The author uses references to spheres and circles, which depict something that ends where it begins, to support his defense. Donne also uses many references to nature, as he does in many of his poems, which has the same reinforcing effect. Some examples of the author doing this would be when he refers to the moving of the earth, and the trepidation of the spheres (9-11). The trepidation of the spheres are believed to be like earthquakes and caused by the planets moving. These movements supposedly occurred without being felt by people on earth. Some of the author's parallels are more far-fetched than others, but all in all his choices in diction provide hard hitting and touching prose.
In the first quatrain Donne provides a parallel between a positive way to view death and a positive way to separate from a lover. He states that, like a dying man, he will be leaving in the physical sense, but will still remain in spirit. In the second quatrain Donne writes, "So let us melt, and make no noise, /No tear-floods, nor-sigh-tempests move," (5-6). The word "melt" was chosen by the author to represent a gradual change in physical state, going form a solid to a liquid, which symbolizes their being separated (5). By these arguments, the narrator hopes to convince his lover that there is no reason to be sad about his absence; rather she should accept this "earthquake" (9). The idea of an earthquake is used to symbolize a matter of misfortune beyond one's control. Dwelling on their unchangeable misfortune would only cause unnecessary sorrow.
The narrator goes on to describe their love as "Dull sublunary lovers' love," in the forth quatrain (13). Sublunary meaning everything below the moon or earthly, something that is subject to change and is definitely something far from perfect (13). This idea of their love being flawed does not seem to go along with the theme in the poem. The theme of the poem is very reassuring of their love's security. It is almost as if the narrator is trying to show his lover that he realizes their relationship is perishable. Donne goes on to explain how even thought their love is going to change, in the physical sense, their souls will still be together (14). Their love consists of three parts: body, soul, and mind, not just body. He states that they have "a love so much refined," no distance could change their bond as one (17). In quatrain six, Donne uses words that reflect...

Find Another Essay On Analysis of A Valediction Forbidding Mourning by John Donne

Analysis of "A Valediction : Forbidding Mourning"

1806 words - 7 pages John Donne was a major English poet and writer, specialized in composing meraphysical poetry. He also wrote about love poetry, religious poems, epigrams, elegies, songs, and sonnets. He was born into a Roman Catholic family. After his diligent study in theology, he ceonverted to Anglicism. This is the reason for most of his poetry to contain spiritual themes.(Wikipedia) In "A Valediction : Forbidding Mourning," Donne writes about a lover bidding

Forbidding Mourning by John Donne Essay

1277 words - 5 pages Relentless LoveDistance can make or break a relationship. It determines whether it is worth staying together, even though a couple cannot physically be together. Most types of love could not handle the elimination of every physical aspect to a relationship. “A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning” by John Donne is a poem about a special kind of love – a relentless love. By using comparisons and similes, Donne conveys the power that

An analysis of John Donnes' "A Valediction: Forbidden Mourning"

800 words - 3 pages In the poem "A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning", by John Donne, the speaker is consoling his lover who is mournful of the speaker's imminent departure. The speaker is saying that since they have stronger than ordinary love for one another, their love will endure the separation. Donne uses metaphysical conceits and comparative imagery to illustrate the crux of the poem. The speaker is reassuring his lover by reminding her of how great their love

Love in John Donne's A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning and Andrew Marvell's To His Coy Mistress

1643 words - 7 pages pattern similar to the weavings of a basket symbolizing continuity as if it's a continuous cycle, which remind you of a circle. Moreover, Donne's "A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning" started and ended the poem with death, again as if it's a continuous cycle emulating a drawing of a circle. When you draw a circle, you start and end at the same point. Donne depicts this idea of a circle by starting and ending the poem with the same point. He pointed

Comparison Between John Donne's "The Flea" and "A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning"

1309 words - 5 pages dramatic lyric rather than a dramatic monologue. The poem focuses on how the man is trying to convince the woman to have sex with him, along with bringing insight to the man's character by his feelings and thoughts about the woman."A Valediction: forbidding Mourning" is recognised as one of Donne's most famous yet simplest poems. It is his most direct statement of his ideal of spiritual love. Unlike, "The Flea," in "A Valediction: forbidding Mourning

Compare and contrast Donne's "A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning" and Marvell's "To His Coy Mistress," also include the idea of metaphysical poetry in the comparison

679 words - 3 pages "To His Coy Mistress". The vigorousness of the argument appears in the breathless lines. Few are end-stopped, and the lines have the rough power of speech. Donne, on the other hand, carries his argument using four line stanzas in "A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning". Unlike Donne, who is prepared to allow some lack of punctuation (between first and second stanzas and frequently within all the stanzas), Marvell's stanza here has a near metronomic

Andrew Marvell's To His Coy Mistress and John Donne's A Valedictorian: Forbidding Mourning

1443 words - 6 pages Donne's "A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning," similarly concentrate on the subject of love. However, each poet contrasts in his conception of love and the way he chooses to disclose this conception through tone, diction, and other figurative language devices. By recognizing the differences, one comes to value and appreciate each poem's significance.

Analysis of Meditation IV by John Donne

1333 words - 5 pages The opening statement of John Donne’s Meditation IV sets a disposition for the whole article. “..Except God, Man is a diminutive to nothing” (Donne 23) is saying man is bigger than the world; excluding the fact that God conquers and controls all. Man is in control of his own life, but God controls his fate. It is also stating that the world is nothing in comparison to man and is not as complex. Donne’s numerous comparisons

Poem Analysis of Meditation 17 by John Donne

1828 words - 7 pages It is quite feasible to state that poetry at its finest is a dazzling and expressive art of words. A poem not only can expose the diplomatic beliefs of societies, but can also articulate passions and sentiments of the author to whom the poem belongs. One of the many fine poems that have been prevalent among the study of literature that is irrefutably powerful is Meditation 17 by John Donne. This poetic essay exposes John Donne’s opinions and

An Analysis Of Three Works By John Donne

1334 words - 5 pages weren't for light, he would stay (Norton, 1089). The last stanza seems to show how he is upset because he must get up to do business. He goes on to say how, "the poor, the foul, the false, love can admit, but not the busied man," to show that if he didn't have to go to work, he could stay in bed with his beloved. He seems to think it unfair that he cannot stay with his beloved since he is a working man. The three poems by John Donne

Examine Donne's "A valediction forbdiggin mourning" in an appreciative manner

583 words - 2 pages A Valediction: forbidding Mourning"A Valediction: forbidding Mourning" is recognised as one of Donne's most famous yet simplest poems. It is his most direct statement of his ideal of spiritual love. Unlike, "The Flea," in "A Valediction: forbidding Mourning" Donne professes a devotion to spiritual love that transcends merely the physical. In this poem, the persona anticipates a physical separation from his beloved; he invokes the nature of that

Similar Essays

A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning By John Donne

581 words - 2 pages “A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning,” by John Donne explores love through the ideas of assurance and separation. Donne uses vivid imagery to impart his moral themes on his audience. A truer, more refined love, Donne explains comes from a connection at the mind, the joining of two souls as one. Physical presence is irrelevant if a true marriage of the minds has occurred, joining a pair of lovers’ souls eternally. In order to describe the form

A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning By John Donne

684 words - 3 pages John Donne's poem, "A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning," is one depicting the beauty of love. The poem, a farewell, is written to his about when Donne must depart for a period of time. His metaphysical style of poetry, including thought provoking comparisons and imagery, makes his style all the more intriguing. This valediction is perhaps his greatest proclamation of love.Donne's use of comparison via simile and metaphor throughout the poem is

A Valediction Forbidding Mourning By John Donne

1860 words - 7 pages stiff twin compasses are two ;Thy soul, the fix'd foot, makes no showTo move, but doth, if th' other do.And though it in the centre sit,Yet, when the other far doth roam,It leans, and hearkens after it,And grows erect, as that comes home.Such wilt thou be to me, who must,Like th' other foot, obliquely run ;Thy firmness makes my circle just,And makes me end where I begun.At the beginning of "A Valediction Forbidding Mourning," the poet, John Donne

Journal On A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning By John Donne

593 words - 2 pages John Donne’s A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning is a distinctive metaphysical poem about love and the connection of passion and feelings. He believes the love with his wife will help them go through the harshness of separation, as it will only strengthen the relationship with his lady.Using skillfully the figure of speech in his poem, John Donne expresses his love to his wife through the valediction. As they have to endure the separation