Analysis Of Aldous Huxley's A Brave New World

890 words - 4 pages

As the story begins, Savage is attempting to free the Deltas by freeing them of their drug addiction. To Savage freedom includes the ability to make rational decisions but the Deltas have no ability to rationalize due to their genetic make-up. As Savage is throwing a way the drugs one of his friends, an Alpha who is capable of reason, approaches him but is stopped by reason. Reason prevents him from helping his friend due to indecision and the inability to calculate the action that will create the best outcome. The angry mob of Deltas are subdued with drugs and anger is replaced with happiness. This example demonstrates that without knowing the consequences of one's action, the original action cannot take place. Members of Huxley's Utopian society have been conditioned to believe in an exaggerated utilitarian ethic. Savage is taken to see The Controller who explains why Utopia has no practical use for the goods of a high culture. Art, science, and religion are not as important as simple pleasure when the end goal is happiness. The Controller has found a perfect recipe for happiness and he argues that the elimination of objective truths and aesthetic beauty were necessary to achieve a quiet peaceful life for everyone. Only, the Alphas have the ability to reason and if it is discovered that they are against the utilitarian regime they are immediately removed from society, to eliminate any possibility of social unrest. (Huxley).
An argument in support of utilitarianism follows the three basic propositions of utilitarianism which are: "(a) Actions are to be judged... by virtue of their consequences ... (b) consequences... [are based on] the amount of happiness or unhappiness created ... (c) each person's happiness counts the same" (Rachels1, pg 100). The Controller explains how there is more happiness for more people when they do not have individual thought. In the name of duty, truth has been eliminated from thought through conditioning. Additionally, the Controller has eliminated the thought of God and Savage can only grasp at the meaning of God. The Controller explains how the belief in God will lead to individualism and degrade the unity of the community and thus its stability. The controller also sacrificed love and desire by making a plethora of vices available to the community. It does not matter how the community becomes happy only that they are happy in the end. It appears that the Controller has met his utilitarian on the surface but upon further investigation it can be found that utilitarianism is not fully supported in Huxley's essay.
Jeremy Bentham believed that humanity is ruled by two masters, pleasure and pain. In the Utopian society the Deltas are not mastered by pleasure and...

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