Analysis Of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s I Have A Dream Speech

972 words - 4 pages

On August 28, 1963, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. delivered one of the
most famous speeches of all time to an audience of more than 200,000
civil rights supporters on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial. In his,
“I have a dream” speech, King addressed his encouragement of white and
black people working together to achieve racial peace and harmony. He
especially wanted to teach the young blacks that equality could be
gained through the use of non-violence. The main reason King used
nonviolence was to create a situation so different from the usual,
that it will open the door to negotiations of desegregation and equal
opportunity. King also urged African Americans to never forget their
dreams and preached that in the eyes of God, blacks should be treated
as equals because they are as good as any other race.

The statement that stands out the most to me in King’s speech is, “I
have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a
nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by
the content of their character.” In this statement, King meant that he
wanted to achieve the equality of every race in a place where only the
white man was welcome and accepted. King had an ideal American dream
where there was no prejudice, no hate, and where everyone was equal.
King felt it was important for his message to appeal to all people no
matter what race they were. King also felt it was important for
African Americans to love and respect people of all races even though
they had been brutally beaten by segregationists. The most important
aspect of the speech was for all people, especially whites and blacks,
to have respect for one another or else

America would remain in segregation.

There were many things that occurred during the civil rights movement
for the “I have a dream” speech to have been written and greatly
admired by so many people. Since segregation was taking place, Martin
Luther King Jr. stood up for what he believed in. He said that the
African Americans weren’t free and weren’t treated equal, as he
thought they should be. He specifically stated, “There will be neither
rest nor tranquility in America until the Negro is granted his
citizenship rights.” Martin Luther King Jr. felt the same as many
other African Americans, hoping that someday all...

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