Analysis Of Franz Kafka's The Judgement

1701 words - 7 pages

Franz Kafka's The Judgement depicts the struggle of father-son relationships. This modernistic story explores Georg Bendemann's many torments, which result from the bonds with both his father and himself. Furthermore, the ever-present and lifelong battle that Georg has been fighting with his father leads him to fight an even greater battle with himself. Ultimately, Georg loses the struggle with himself by letting go of his newly found independence and instead, letting external forces decide his fatal outcome.

Georg Bendemann's relationship with his father has always been a complex and undulating one. Initially, up until the death of Georg's mother, his father had had total control over Georg- both psychologically and business wise (Lawson 22). In correlation with his father's power, Georg has been a pathetic, lonely, and subservient person. While speaking of Georg, the narrator states, "Perhaps during his mother's lifetime his father's insistence on having everything his own way in the business had hindered him from developing any real activity of his own" (Kafka 78). Since his father has been making all of the decisions, Georg has not been able to develop into an independent and strong person. However, a dramatic shift occurs when Georg's mother passes away. Georg is the one who starts calling the shots, and it is the father who gets pushed into the background. The father's loss of power is seen when he states, ."..I'm not equal to things any longer, my memory's failing, I haven't an eye for so many things any longer" (Kafka 82). During his father's decline, Georg takes the initiative to become the self-assertive individual that he has always longed to be. In addition, not only does Georg take control of his business life for the first time, but he also alleviates his non-existent social life by becoming engaged. Obviously, things are turning around for Georg in a very positive light. However, it is this same turn-around that becomes problematic for Georg. Due to the huge discrepancy between Georg's past and present, he finds it hard to adjust to a new life. As a result, he still continues to play the role of the subservient son by constantly looking for his father's approval. Georg specifically seeks this approval when he goes to ask his father whether or not he should mail the letter to his friend in St. Petersberg (Lawson 20). After coming into his father's room Georg comments, "But before I posted the letter I wanted to let you know" (Kafka 82). However, during the discussion with his father, Georg does not receive a paternal approval and mentally falls apart as a result, which leads to the reversal of their father/son roles (Lawson 23). The turning point that leads to their role reversals is seen when the father lashes out after Georg tries to cover him up in bed (Lawson 23). This outburst is shown when the narrator states that the father "threw the blankets off with a strength that sent them all flying in a moment...

Find Another Essay On Analysis of Franz Kafka's The Judgement

Franz Kafka's Novella, The Metamorphosis Essay

1395 words - 6 pages One of the saddest aspects of Franz Kafka's novella, The Metamorphosis, concerns the fact that young Gregor Samsa genuinely cares about this family, working hard to support them, even though they do little for themselves. On the surface, Kafka's 1916 novella, seems to be just a tale of Gregor morphing into a cockroach, but, a closer reading with Marx and Engels economic theories in mind, reveals an imposing metaphor that gives the improbable

Metamorphosis of the Family in Franz Kafka's The Metamorphosis

1171 words - 5 pages The Metamorphosis of the Family Before the caterpillar can transform into a butterfly, it must go through a metamorphosis. The cocoon in which the caterpillar hibernates is in fact just a conveyance towards another life form. Gregor, in Franz Kafka's novella The Metamorphosis, is similarly a vehicle for such an important transformation, in this case the reformation of his family. The metamorphosis of Gregor facilitates the gradual change

The Metamorphosis as a Depiction of Franz Kafka's Life

1189 words - 5 pages The Metamorphosis as a Depiction of Franz Kafka's Life The Metamorphosis is said to be one of Franz Kafka's best works of literature. It shows the difficulties of living in a modern society and the struggle for acceptance of others when in a time of need. In this novel Kafka directly reflects upon many of the negative aspects of his personal life, both mentally and physically. The relationship between Gregor and his father is in many ways

Franz Kafka's The Metamorphosis and Joseph Conrad's Heart of Darkness

2066 words - 8 pages , Richard, ‘The Metamorphosis, “The Stoker”’, in Richard H. Lawson, Franz Kafka (New York: The Ungar Publishing Company, 1987). Conrad, Joseph, Heart of Darkness (London: Harper Press, 2013). Boa, Elizabeth, ‘The Double Taboo: The Male Body in The Judgement, The Metamorphosis, and In the Penal Colony’, in Elizabeth Boa, Kafka: Gender, Class, and Race in the Letters and Fictions (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1996). Rolleston, James, ‘The

Franz Kafka's "The Metamorphosis": A Report

1707 words - 7 pages Given a copy of Franz Kafka's The Metamorphosis, interpretation proves to be a challenge because his profound use of language establishes symbolic significance that is tough to decipher. "The Metamorphosis can be seen as an intensely introspective work, relating to itself and providing Gregor Samsa as a concrete metaphor for metaphor itself" (Way 267). Kafka's pessimistic view on society and the struggle to find one's identity are overriding

Marxist Perspective on Franz Kafka's The Metamorphosis

1802 words - 7 pages Marxist Perspective on Franz Kafka's The Metamorphosis On the surface, Franz Kafka's 1916 novella, The Metamorphosis, seems to be just a tale of a man who woke up one morning to find himself transformed into an insect. But, a closer reading with Marx and Engel's economic theories in mind reveals an overarching metaphor that gives the improbable story a great deal of relevance to the structure of society. Gregor Samsa, the protagonist

Standards in Franz Kafka's The Metamorphosis

855 words - 3 pages In Franz Kafka’s story The Metamorphosis, Gregor Samsa falls victim, to some strange affliction which somehow turns him into a colossal insect of some sort. His bizarre and tragic story takes place in a European apartment in the early twentieth century; a time in which much stock was placed in both etiquette and the appearance of propriety. These standards found throughout the society in which he is placed leads to his ultimate downfall

The Dehumanizing Effect of Alienation and the Restoration of Self-Identity in Franz Kafka's The Metamorphosis

1700 words - 7 pages In the novella “The Metamorphosis”, Franz Kafka focuses on the topic of alienation and considers its underlying effect on the human consciousness and self-identity. The alienation Kafka instigates is propagated towards the main character Gregor Samsa, who inevitably transforms into a giant cockroach. The alienation by family relations affects him to the extent that he prioritizes his extensive need to be the family’s provider before his own well

Critical analysis of essay of Reza Banakar's essay "In Search of Heimate: A Note on Franz Kafka's Concept of Law"

830 words - 4 pages quickly switch into Josef K's relationships in The Trial. The essay can be confusing at times but after hours of analysis, the essay seems to be fitting for this stately stroy. Although the essay is unorganized and uses a lot of legal jargon that may be unfamiliar for college students, it is believed that the essay "In search of Heimat: A Note on Franz Kafka's Concept of Law" by Reza Banakar should be included in the new critical edition of

The subject of free will as shown in Kafka's "The Judgement", "A Report to the Academy", and "A Country Doctor"

687 words - 3 pages P.J. O'Rourke of Rolling Stone magazine once wrote, "One of the annoying things about believing in free will and individual responsibility is the difficulty of finding somebody to blame your problems on. And when you do find somebody, it's remarkable how often his picture turns up on your driver's license." Perhaps Franz Kafka, by not believing in free will, made his own bitter existance just slightly more bearable by not having to blame

Franz Kafka's Life Reflected in his Work, The Metamorphosis

2376 words - 10 pages Franz Kafka's Life Reflected in his Work, The Metamorphosis The Metamorphosis written by Franz Kafka is considered one of the few great, poetic works of the twentieth century. Addressing The Metamorphosis, Elias Canetti, a Nobel Prize-winning author, has commented, "In The Metamorphosis Kafka has reached the height of his mastery: he has written something which he could never surpass, because there is nothing which The Metamorphosis could

Similar Essays

Social Analysis Of Franz Kafka's The Metamorphosis

3867 words - 15 pages Social Analysis of Franz Kafka's The Metamorphosis Franz Kafka was not Jewish; Franz Kafka was not Czech, Franz Kafka only identified himself by his own perception of life, and a reality of his own creation. Kafka's family, a prosperous middle class home of economic strivers, embraced the German Jewish circles of Prague, seeking to assimilate with language and Jewish culture. Kafka, in the traditional manner he is remembered, was born into a

Analysis Of Franz Kafka's The Metamorphosis

1746 words - 7 pages Franz Kafka's The Metamorphosis is so strikingly absurd that it has engendered countless essays dissecting every possible rational and irrational aspect of the book. One such essay is entitled "Kafka's Obscurity" by Ralph Freedman in which he delves down into the pages of The Metamorphosis and ferrets out the esoteric aspects of Kafka's writing. Freedman postulates that Gregor Samsa progresses through several transformations: a transformation of

Franz Kafka's The Trial Essay

1667 words - 7 pages An enigmatic storyteller, Franz Kafka's legacy has long remained the subject of many writings on existential literature. His stories explore themes which are so depressing, and at times seem so futile, as to put off many a reader while entrancing yet another. The most popular of his works, The Trial is no less perplexing than its brethren, and a perfunctory examination leaves the reader distinctly unsatisfied. After all, what is the point of

Franz Kafka's The Metamorphosis Essay

1189 words - 5 pages In this paper I will interpret the short story, The Metamorphosis, by Franz Kafka. My purpose is to explain to my classmates the short story’s goal what Kafka wanted to transmit to people. I want to expand more why this short story is considered one of the best poetic imagination works. In my research I expect to use Kafka’s work, The Metamorphosis as my primary source. Important other sources include essay critiques from