This website uses cookies to ensure you have the best experience. Learn more

Analysis Of Greek Tragedy Using The Aristotilean Model

1339 words - 5 pages

Greek tragedies, written in ancient times, are still a standard for tragedies written today. Contrary to diminishing in value over time, these tragedies have become cherished pieces of work in the sophisticated literate culture of today. However, one can not delve into these precious works of beautiful literary verse without first having background knowledge of the context they were written, and of the structure they follow. There are several terms, as well as an analysis of tragedies by Aristotle, a philosopher who experienced them firsthand. By knowing the structural basis of tragic works before reading them, one is able to better understand them and appreciate them more fully for the prized trophies of classic literature they are.

First of all, one must realize that tragedies were first written for the stage. Although the exact atmosphere of an ancient performance is rarely recreated, by realizing the context of the play, one can already better understand the reason as well as meaning for such a performance. Aristotle clearly defines what makes a good tragedy, as well as other performing pieces in his volume, The Poetics. He specifies the magnitude of a work can be generally judged by its length-the longer the poet can keep the audience captivated without losing sight of the primary focus of the play, the greater the tragedy is. It cannot be so long, however, as that the memory can not take in the entire performance. Aristotle also gives a history of plays and of the innovations and developments they have undergone. Aeschylus was responsible for the first innovation in classic tragedies, reducing the number in the chorus to 12-15, which previously was around fifty, and introducing a second actor on stage. Sophocles later introduced the third character, which is what is seen in both the plays Agamemnon and Oedipus Rex. He also added background scenery. Also in development came the tone of seriousness, and the changing in rhythm to that more closely related to regular conversation speech. Aristotle, along with the history of tragedies, included an analysis of the subjects. He states the tragedy always deals with lofty subjects, characters greater than ourselves. They accomplish this all in a grand style of verse. The events in tragedies also generally all take place in a single day, regardless of how long they took in real life.

All the previous descriptions of tragedy fall under the seven parts of tragedy Aristotle describes. First of all, tragedy involves mimesis, that is, it is imitation of real events. This gives credibility to the work and helps captivate the audience. Secondly, it is serious. This helps distinguish it from comedy. Tragedies also include action that is complete and with magnitude. Language in tragedies utilizes of rhythm and harmony. The rhythm and harmony should not be used throughout, however i.e. some bits are spoken while others are sung. Tragedies should be performed, not narrated, which...

Find Another Essay On Analysis of Greek Tragedy Using the Aristotilean Model

Analysis of the Role of the Chorus in anicent Greek plays. Using "Oedipus The King" as an example

853 words - 3 pages Introduction: In Greek plays, the chorus invariably adds complexity and depth to the play and the message it is trying to portray. However to say that the chorus hinders or impedes our understanding of the play is a grievous inaccuracy. Just because an element adds to the complexity of the play, it does not necessarily mean that it would detract the audience's understanding of the play. In this instance the opposite in true of the chorus. The

An Analysis of the Pharmaceutical Industry using Porter's Five Force model, PEST, BCG Matrix and predicting future prospects

3089 words - 12 pages medicine for a common cold, aspirin for a headache, and antacid relief for the stomach.The three above-mentioned groups pursue different strategies and operate in different environments. Porter's five-force model can be applied to illustrate the differences between the groups. Below is a summary of each force and the corresponding strategic group:RIVALRYPrescription: High, patents protect each company when a drug is first developed. However, production

Analysis of the Tragedy of "Othello"

981 words - 4 pages Untitled Analysis of the Tragedy of "Othello" William Shakespeare is considered to be among the greatest playwrights that have ever lived. He has written dozens and dozens of brilliant plays, most of those plays have been made into movies. One such play that has been made into a movie is "Othello." The play "Othello" is one of Shakespeare's greatest tragedies. It is about a black general in the

Analysis of the Tragedy of "Othello"

981 words - 4 pages Untitled Analysis of the Tragedy of "Othello" William Shakespeare is considered to be among the greatest playwrights that have ever lived. He has written dozens and dozens of brilliant plays, most of those plays have been made into movies. One such play that has been made into a movie is "Othello." The play "Othello" is one of Shakespeare's greatest tragedies. It is about a black general in the

The Tragedy of King Lear Analysis

2197 words - 9 pages The Tragedy of King Lear Analysis Lear: By Jupiter, I swear no! Kent: By Juno, I swear ay. In The Tragedy of King Lear, particularly in the first half of the play, Lear continually swears to the gods. He invokes them for mercies and begs them for destruction; he binds both his oaths and his curses with their names. The older characters—Lear and Gloucester—tend view their world as strictly within the moral framework of the pagan

The Role and Structure of Greek Tragedy in Philip Roth’s Eli the Fanatic

1784 words - 7 pages The Role and Structure of Greek Tragedy in Philip Roth’s Eli the Fanatic When one’s in pain—physical, mental, or emotional—one always believes it is worse than everyone else’s. Yet when an acquaintance bemoans a bad day, one still manages to wave it off: it could not be worse than one’s own pain. Even if it is a past pain and there are only scars, those scars are tenderer than the friend’s current sores. Individuals forget that

Law of Religion vs. Law of Man in the Greek Tragedy, "Antigone#

669 words - 3 pages Whatever your religion there is usually one thing in common, the laws of the religion must be upheld in all situations. With this in mind there could be many situations; it could mean to stand your ground under peer pressure, it could be if one is faced by tragedy, or even if one must stand against the laws of man. This theme is shown in the courageous acts of Antigone in the Greek drama "Antigone" where she stands against a law made by her

The importance of structure in "The Agamemnon" is a classic Greek tragedy written by Aeschylus

1586 words - 6 pages The Agamemnon is a classic Greek tragedy written by Aeschylus in which he entails the continuation of the curse on the house of Atreus in the time period following the end of the Trojan War and the return of King Agamemnon. This play tells of the murders of Cassandra and Agamemnon-by-Agamemnon's wife Clytemestra. Throughout the play many aspects have a profound effect on the structure. Things such as the chorus, audience, the use of common

The Analysis of the Five Factor Model

2107 words - 8 pages The Analysis of the Five Factor Model In this essay, first the Five Factor Model (FFM) will be described. Secondly, psychologists for and against the model will be looked at. Following this, the stability of traits will be looked at, both longitudinal and cross situational. Finally, the application of the model within and outside psychology will be evaluated to show support that the FFM provides a solid foundation for

Analysis of WalMart's Approach To Employee Management Using SHRM Boxell/Purcell Model

2426 words - 10 pages intellectual and service capabilities than in its hard assets"Wal-Mart are aware of this and so by examining Wal-Marts practices using the 'best fit' perceptive will give a better understanding as to why they have adopted their various practices by linking them to their key organisational strategy and will also help to explain their stance on unionisation.The 'best fit' school (Boxell & Purcell (2000), covers a range of ideas, perspectives and

An analysis of the five gap model

1827 words - 7 pages quality of service exceeds expectations. When the outcome is negative, then the customer will feel dissatisfied but when the outcome is positive, the customer will feel satisfied and possibly delighted with the service. The reason that gap five is the total of the four gaps is because customers will measure the whole service as their experience of the business.ConclusionIn summary, the Gap Analysis Model can help identify causes of poor service

Similar Essays

Analysis Of Various Greek Plays, Including Antigone. Discussing The Role Of Greek Tragedy Westview/Hillview Essay

1393 words - 6 pages Ancient Greek Tragedy Every good story that speaks to the human spirit has conflict. The best stories have various kinds of conflict, and some of those struggles are internal, rooted in the psyches of fascinating characters. The Greeks developed internal conflict within their main characters so well that the the tragedies themselves are riveting. Unlike modern literature where characters are typically torn between a choice of what is right

Analysis On Greek Tragedy

883 words - 4 pages Greek Tragedy Greek Tragedy The Ancient Greek Tragedy is a form of art based on human suffring that offers audience pleasure. The word `tragedy' appears to have been used to describe different phenomena at different times. It has being a tradition of drama that has played a unique and important role in history; from its obscure origins in the theatres of Athens 2500 years ago to the more recent `social' realism and tragedy

Case Analysis Using The Eight Step Model

1509 words - 7 pages Case Analysis Using the Eight-Step Model The eight-step module is a framework tool used to help analyze and assist you in thinking through an ethical dilemma. After Koch Industries acquired Georgia-Pacific, they immediately took steps to transfer its unique and highly ethical culture to their new “family member.” Tom Butz along with a few other Koch employees and Georgia-Pacific employees were in charge of getting the transition started

Sophocles:The Legend Of Greek Tragedy Essay

979 words - 4 pages tragedian, and he has become immortal within the realm of Greek poets. The spirit of Sophocles is the strife to understand the irresistible movement of events, and man's helplessness as far as fate is concerned (Hamilton 258-59). This strife for knowledge is the driving force behind Sophocles' great tragedies. Aristotle wrote, "Tragedy should be a serious and complete imitation of action; it should arouse pity and fear and provide a catharsis, or