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Analysis Of Medea By Euripides

871 words - 3 pages

Marriage – the amalgamation of two imperfect souls to form an affectionate and beautiful relationship – is exceptionally intricate and delicate. Two different people with different insights come together to form a harmonious relationship. Power, or control, is a chief concept that can “make or break” the relationship. Distribution of the ruling is frequently divided into males versus females. This partition leads to many conflicts and tribulations. In the catastrophic Greek play Medea, by Euripides, the liaison between Medea and Jason demonstrates how both males and females assert power in the relationship and how incorrect usage of this supremacy leads to dilemmas.
Initially, males direct the lives all members in the relationship by either negatively or positively utilizing their power. The males most often possess a majority of the power in the relationship. At the outset, Jason deceives Medea by having an affair with Creon’s daughter. He recognized that he had complete authority and that Medea would have no option but to accept his actions. Jason uses his dominance negatively and he believes he has the “right” to, since he had helped Medea previously by bringing her amongst the civilized Greeks. This clearly demonstrates how the males avow their control in the relationship; they can abscond when they desire and stay when they desire. They guide how the futures of their bond will be shaped with their decisions. This “guidance” is a component of their clout as the male figure. Although males may neglect their command, they can also wisely exercise it to help nurture the relationship. After realizing his faux pas, Jason explains to Medea that he is “prepared to give…” (34). He comprehends that although he made a mistake, he can still help provide for the family by giving some financial assistance. He understands his responsibility and comes to the conclusion that he must properly apply his power and endow with. In total, Jason illustrates that he is the alpha lion, and that his power will only affect his relationship based on how he uses his power.
Moreover, Euripides incorporates Medea into the relationship to convey the idea that females also possess a dominant role in the struggle over dominance, but their power form is different compared to males. Medea elucidates that even in the arduous times, she assisted Jason and supported their union. In a direct conversation with Jason, she tells him, “…after I’ve done all this to help you, you brute, you betray me…” (27). She explains that although she took care of Jason and supported him whenever he needed her help, he used his massive quantity of power...

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