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Analysis Of "Mississippi Burning" In The Context Of Setting, Events, Characters And Their Role, Techniques And The Historical Period

1443 words - 6 pages

Mississippi Burning is a film directed by Alan Parker that was released in 1988. It depicts the case of Mississippi Burning, which took place in 1964, where three civil rights workers went missing. The FBI was notified only to find the sheriffs office linked to the Ku Klux Klan and accountable for the disappearances of the three boys.This film follows an investigation carried out by FBI agents into the disappearances of three civil rights workers, who campaigned for the rights of "blacks".As the case unfolds, vital evidence, such as the workers abandoned car are found and turmoils are faced by the main characters, Agents Anderson and Ward. The case proceeds when more FBI agents are called in ...view middle of the document...

The film "Mississippi Burning" gives an accurate account of the 1960s; however a few discrepancies can be identified through analysis of that historical period.In the movie, many scenes present the reminder of segregation and racial discrimination as seen in the 1960s. These include the first scene, where a contrast is shown between the two water fountains, at the restaurant, where coloureds were separated from the whites and the strong presence of the distinctive racial groups.Some of the discrepancies identified were that there was no representations of retaliation from "blacks", an expression that the FBI were the heroes and a stereotypical view given to all locals, which was not the case.The film, "Mississippi Burning" contains a vast array of characters, but two main characters are Ward and Anderson, who are the FBI agents in control of this investigation.Agent Ward, acted by William Dafoe, is the more conservative type of person. He was described by Anderson as the type that crossed the t's, implying that Ward only knew one approach. Ward's role in the movie was also primarily dominating as he made all the decisions such as interviewing witnesses and gathering evidence; however, it was apparent that with this approach, the case wouldn't be solved.William Dafoe portrayed Ward convincingly through his attire, where he was formally dressed at all times and the use of glasses to depict a compliant attitude. The way he spoke also brought about a convincing attitude where formal language was always used.However in contrast, Agent Anderson, acted by Gene Hackman, is the type of person that does things his way. Anderson's method was demonstrated during the film when Anderson passively scrutinised the deputy's wife to obtain facts required for the conviction. He also orchestrated other events, for instance, the scene when the KKK members turned on each other due to Anderson causing an internal quarrel. It is obvious that if it wasn't for Anderson, the case wouldn't have been solved.Gene Hackman portrayed Anderson very convincingly as his attire was always casual and his use of language depicted his aggressiveness. His stature was also related to the attitude Anderson portrayed as well as the aggressive voice that accompanied it."Mississippi Burning" was released by Orion Productions in 1988. At this time, segregation had been minimised in most communities and equality between races and gender were on the rise. Society had become modern where living standards and the economy had increased. The "Klan" had also gone into hiding and laws had been created in order to protect the rights of each individual no matter what race they were.There were still the groups/individuals that were prejudice in different aspects of life. But, the majority had started to treat each other as equal whilst others were treated like heroes for their efforts such as Martin Luther King Jr who received a Nobel Peace Prize that year.Much progress...

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