Analysis Of Narrative Life Of Frederick Douglas

981 words - 4 pages

Brandon WinProfessor PorterComp IOctober 1st 2014South ParkSouth Park has always been one of my most favorite shows of all time. I used to watch it as a kid, and I'm still watching and glued to it in my teenage years. One might ask why I would still watch cartoons at such an adolescent age. The simple truth is, South Park isn't just a cartoon; it involves content and information that can be critically analyzed as well as political and social innuendoes. Trey Parker and Matt Stone, the only two creators of the whole show, are portraying their own emotional distress and discourse through the cartoon. I love the fact that all the voice overs were only done by these two, and that it required no extra actors or voice-overs to complete the TV show as a whole. Eric Cartman, one of the most round and vibrant characters among the four boys, is usually used as the social and political voice of Parker and Stone. Through every episode, I am always wondering what Cartman represents because he hates hippies and has very strong views on health care, euthanasia, the war on Iraq and presidential elections. He speaks as he wishes, and I love the fact that he could give less of a damn. Trey Parker and Matt Stone are brilliant cartoonists, as they present views and opinions with no direct agenda. Unlike Jon Stewart or John Oliver, they do not boil everything down to right or wrong. Instead they pick a place in the middle, one where they excrete on the faces of any paradigm and create different perspectives and views on common global topics. They are the true specialists in what they do, because as childish as South Park looks, most of its episodes are all interestingly controversial as well as very debatable. One cannot be bored of watching South Park because it keeps up-to-date with modern day issues and incorporates them into the script.South Park has really aided me in my intellectual and emotional growth. For example, in one of the episodes titled "Douche and Turd", the South Park Elementary school holds an election for the newly upcoming mascots; "The Giant Douche" and the "Turd Sandwich". When the episode first starred in 2004, I was but a kid and so seeing school mascots as turds really cracked me up alone. I wasn't aware until I revisited the episode again that they were making fun of John Kerry and George Bush in the 2004 presidential elections, and this realization made the episode a hell lot more interesting and intriguing. Both John Kerry and George Bush were unfavorable candidates of the elections, and Parker and Stone wanted to point out that when faced with the decision to choose between a douche and a turd, it is okay and morally fine to abstain from voting. I find this very powerful, as I take the moral as the episode as one of social pressures and...

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