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Analysis Of Nick’s Father In Ernest Hemingway's Indian Camp

722 words - 3 pages


Indian Camp

Analysis of Nick’s Father

 

	In Earnest Hemmingway’s story Indian Camp, from his first book In Our Time, there is a character named Henry refereed to in this story as Nick’s father. Nick’s father is a doctor. A closer look at Nick’s father reveals that he is quite a paradoxical figure.

	On one hand, Nick’s father appears to be a great father who is nurturing caring and wants only the best for his son. "Nick lay back with his fathers arms around him." This quote shows that Nick’s father is affectionate towards his son and is caring. When at the home of the Indian woman Nick’s father begins to explain to him why they are there. He tells him that the woman is very sick and that she needs his help. The woman is screaming in agony and Nick’s father tells him that, " What she is going through is called being in labor. The baby wants to be born and she wants it to be born. All her muscles are trying to get the baby born. That is what is happening when she screams." This is a rather direct way of telling your son what happens when a woman is in labor, but as a doctor maybe he wanted his son to learn biologically what went on. After the baby is born Nick’s father finds out that the Indian womans husband had committed suicide. The quotes, " Take Nick out of the shanty, George" and "I’m terribly sorry I brought you along, Nickie. It was an awful mess to put you through." also help show how in some senses Nick’s father has compassion for his son. The fact that he feels bad that his son had to witness the dead man means that he is sensitive towards his sons’ feelings. Also under extreme situations, the mans death, his father reefers to him as Nickie not Nick as in the rest of the story. This also shows compassion.

	On the other hand, Nick’s father can be seen as insensitive, uncaring, and not very compassionate at all. Looking at the same quote, when Nick’s...

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