Analysis Of Samuel Taylor Coleridge's The Pains Of Sleep

924 words - 4 pages

Throughout the beginning of the poem there are religious undertones Coleridge uses words like bended knee and reverential to highlight a religious belief and perhaps a plea to God to cure the “Pains of Sleep” this is interesting as he seems to feel “humbled” by the spirit presence. He mentions being weak but realises he is blest by this power. The religious undertone suggests to me a feeling of utter helplessness.

There is a rhythm throughout the poem with strong rhyme, this pattern is like heavy breathing you have when you try to go to sleep it could also represent the rhythmical counting of sheep.

There is alliteration of the ‘s’ sound this sounds like snoring and again follows the gentle rhythmic pattern and also the words silently and slow are linked because they are indirectly describing the body’s state whilst asleep.

The poem is written in iambic pentameter with a clearly defined rhyme scheme throughout, although there are some variations

Coleridge uses the word no twice in line 8 which emphasises the fact that there is no way out, no whispers, no thought, just despair and a lack of control.

Throughout the poem there are clearly defined rhyme changes, the poem goes backwards and forwards from aabb to abab.

The fact that there the poem has no stanza divides represents the long and painful road to sleep and the never ending fight with insomnia.

At the end of lines 20, 22, 25 and 26 there are exclamation marks which shown strength and a fight, the transition from the first part of the poem to the second is defined by the introduction of a theme of desire, passion and fear all of which are interlinked in religious teachings but the poem is using the good parts of religion and then quickly switches to the forbidden parts of religion and the way he would be scorned if people knew what he was thinking. It is like he is ashamed of how he feel and he knows he is doing wrong. This captures the frustration and the regret of having to deal with the situation in a Jeckle and Hyde sort of way, in that person one is very calm and although frustrated manages to turn to religion for help whereas in the second part of the poem they rebel against religion and it’s teachings and have corrupt thoughts and feelings.

The alliteration of the s sound is used again here but in a different way the s becomes a strong violent sound rather that the soft soothing one it was before
In the third part there is a combination of soft and hard sounds In the words that underpin the...

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