Analysis Of The Peom "The Crazy Woman" By Gwendolyn Brooks

733 words - 3 pages

The Conflict of the poem “The Crazy Woman” dramatizes how the woman is different from other people. When she does things that she enjoys people call her crazy for not being the same as them and doing stuff they enjoy. The woman expresses herself through the seasons because they are different but in a way very similar. Just like the woman they are all people but they just enjoy different things. The action of the poem is to show people to be themselves, have individuality and not let what people say bother them. The speaker’s tone is portrayed as gloomy by using words as gray , frosty dark , and most terribly. It affects my interpretation of the poem by making it seem as if the speaker is depressed. When looking more into the poem I realized that it is more about how she breaking from them social norms and crossing boundaries.
The speaker of the poem is Gwendolyn Brooks when she writes “ I shall not sing a May song.-“ (8) She uses the word I which means she is referring to herself. In the first stanza she uses the setting as months, which are November and May. She explains how May songs should be happy and full of cheer while November songs are dark and less cheery. This makes the poem contradict itself because November songs are not usually dark as within this month everyone is giving thanks and praising for the holiday Thanksgiving. Throughout the first stanza she is trying to stress the importance of how one must choose to conform to society and sing in the month of May in order to be the same as everyone else. Or the people can do their own thing and sing whenever they please. Brooks writes how a “ A May song should be gay-“(2) and describes the month of November gray and frosty dark, when in actuality it’s the gray of May that brings the beauty and happiness of May. This show how most people reinforce what everyone else bears and they appreciate things...

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