This website uses cookies to ensure you have the best experience. Learn more

Analysis Of The Poem 'lost Heritage', Written By Heather Buck

1015 words - 4 pages

The poem ‘Lost Heritage’, written by Heather Buck is concerned with the forgotten past, our lost heritage. In this free verse poem the speaker preaches that in today’s generation we have lost our touch with the past. Today’s children are blind to the importance and significance of our past, our heritage because it is failed to be taught and provided. The speaker’s realization that children of the modern day world are deprived the knowledge of the intricate and colorful past is explored in this poem. The speakers sullen tone, dark imagery and the constant theme of lost Buck is able to emphasize the connection that has been lost between the present day and our heritage, and how he this disturbs him.The first stanza brings in the in the main theme, what the speaker is preaching about, the importance and significance of our heritage. Bucks appreciation of the past is set-up through the extended metaphor of carpets in this first stanza, which continues throughout the poem. This metaphor is established to represent our past our heritage, through this extended metaphor Buck attempts to emphasize the significance and importance of our heritage. The opening line "Coreopsis, saffron, madder, daily we tread kaleidoscopes of color, on Persian rugs we set our feet" indicates the speakers view on our past, a colorful and bright heritage. The importance of the past is also realized by the speaker, he/she believes that our heritage influences our lives significantly, “The intricate patterns that shape our lives”. The first stanza is mainly concerned with the beauty and importance of human heritage, however Buck already here introduces wrongdoings that we are doing beauty. This idea is casually hinted in the second stanza with the simple usage of ‘tread’. The disrespect that we have for this beautiful past, which we tread all over is continued to be developed as the poem continues. Blind to the woven threads and dyes’ (line 4). The word blind, referring to the metaphor of carpets, shows how in this generation we are blind to our heritage; we do not realize or appreciate its significance in our world.The beauty and significance of the past described in stanza one is shown to be unappreciated as the poem continues, “We inherit more then we know from the dust and bones”. This message from the speaker is further stressed in the description of the dead ‘those lying under the Churchyard’s stones’, our past our hertiage. The speaker believes that our heritage is a colorful important part in our lives as described in the first stanza, however no such appreciation and admiration is depicted in the second and third stanza. The dead are portrayed with a dark gloomy aura, and the carpets portraying the image of the dead are similar, “An uneasy marriage, for the oak beams long ago bent to the flailings of heat, cold and rain”. The description the dead our heritage sharply contrasts what was...

Find Another Essay On Analysis of the poem 'Lost Heritage', written by Heather Buck

An Analysis of The Lost World by Arthur Conan Doyle

2079 words - 8 pages An Analysis of The Lost World by Arthur Conan Doyle 'TLW' was written in 1912 and was set in the author's present. This novel falls under an adventure/exploration genre. Usually in an adventure or an exploration novel the following takes place; the story is usually set in the present, the story is driven by a quest, which comes out of wanting to find evidence to support a theory, the hero is established, and whilst the

Analysis of The Lost World by Michael Crichton

1366 words - 5 pages Analysis of The Lost World by Michael Crichton Michael Crichton's novel, The Lost World began with the exposition of a character who is infamous to Crichton's work, Ian Malcom. The entire introduction and prologue is about Malcom and his scientific views and theories. In a section of the book called 'Hypothesis';, Malcom discusses a theory of 'lost worlds'; - areas in which extinct beings may live, with Richard Levine, a man who's ideas were

Analysis of the poem "Prayer of Steel" by Carl Sanburg

1323 words - 5 pages formalist reading of the poem"Prayer of Steel" is a short poem composed of 9 lines, the ninth being the longest. The cohesive devices in the poem will be analyzed on three levels: lexical, grammatical, and phonological. The analysis will be made first of the individual stanzas, then of the overall structure of the whole poem. Leech's concept of cohesion will be referred to where necessary.General observationsThe title "Prayers of Steel" is an example

Analysis of the poem "The truly great" by Stephen Spender

1232 words - 5 pages Written By Shaun Kearney 6E 2003"The Truly Great", a treatise on greatness.(Poem written by Stephen Spender)This poem, broadly, is an attempt to describe what makes a person "truly" great. The poem was written in the 1930's during wartime, this no doubt influenced the poet. However, soldiers are not the only people he is referring to. He is essentially referring to anyone who selflessly fights for what they believe in."I think continually of

"The Loner" - Written by Julie Holder, poem evaluation

1019 words - 4 pages "The loner" is a poem revolving around the experiences of one boy's isolation in a school playground. Written by Julie Holder, the poetic techniques within this poem such as alliteration, rhythm, similes and metaphors exemplify its slow and doleful tone and, when collaborated, add to the overall effect of the poem. It's explores the environment surrounding the character and his response to the seclusion. Considerable emphasis has been applied to

Analysis of the Poem by Edgar Allan Poe "Bridal Ballad"

1271 words - 5 pages 1837 January edition of the Southern Literary Messenger. It was later re-titled as "Bridal Ballad" when it was printed in the 31st of July edition of the Saturday Evening Post in 1841. The stanzas, as well as rhyming and other techniques, construct a natural flow and rhythm for the poem and emphasise the bride's emotional distress. The poem is one of the few works by Edgar Allan Poe to be written in the perspective of a woman, specifically a

Poetry Analysis of the poem "I, Too" by Langston Hughes

860 words - 3 pages The poem I, Too, written by Langston Hughes, uses excellent language, vivid imagery and strong sounds to express the poet's feelings towards racism. I, Too is an anti-discrimination poem, which shows the injustice of racism. The poem is very effective because of its genuine emotions.The poem is situated in America and describes a black man's personal experience with racial discrimination. He is treated as if he is an embarrassment to the white

Analysis of the Poem "Lucifer in Starlight" by George Meredith

783 words - 3 pages Examining a poem in detail can bring out new meanings and ideas. By careful analysis, the full beauty of the poem can be appreciated. The poem 'Lucifer in Starlight (p. 959)', by George Meredith, can be analyzed to refine the authors purpose, by examining every subtle hint, every possibility, for a deeper theme. Also, 'deciphering' formal literary techniques such as metaphor, connotation, and symbolism is the key to unlock other expressions. The

Analysis of poem "The Door" by Miroslav Holub

509 words - 2 pages ", evoking images of human tampering with nature, and the idea of large possibility.The idea of possibility is conveyed by the use of the word "Maybe" in both stanza one, and twice in the second stanza. The ideas present in the second stanza build up the same way as in the first stanza; there is a repetition of structure and style. It begins with brining the poem back to reality, and ending with "the picture of a picture", conjuring the idea of an

Analysis of the poem Design by Robert Frost

1050 words - 5 pages In the poem Design by Robert Frost, Robert starts off the poem by telling the readers the view he has in front of him. A white spider, a white moth and a white flower; all these things have one thing in common they are all white. White is the color most often associated with innocence, perfection, the good, the beginning and the new. White is supposed to embody the idea of purity and goodness. When we think of the color white we think of

Analysis of the poem Barbie Doll, by Marge Piercy

1360 words - 5 pages Barbie Doll’ written by Marge Piercy (1973) This girlchild was born as usual And presented dolls that did pee-pee And miniature GE stoves and irons And wee lipsticks the color of cherry candy. Then in the magic of puberty, a classmate said: You have a great big nose and fat legs. She was healthy, tested intelligent, Possessed strong arms and back, Abundant sexual drive and manual dexterity. She went to and fro apologizing. Everyone

Similar Essays

Commentary On The Lost Heritage By Heather Buck

2435 words - 10 pages Commentary on the Lost Heritage by Heather Buck The Lost Heritage by Heather Buck expresses the message that in today's lifestyle, we have lost our touch with our past. The main theme of the poem is the fact that the present's children are not informed about their detailed past. We are blind to the importance and significance of our heritage. The opening phrase "Coreopsis, saffron, madder, daily we tread

An American Family: Rhetorical Analysis Of "Searching In The Wrong Places" By Heather Koehler

555 words - 2 pages , dysfunctional means different. Even though Reba's family has these flaws, it is still an All-American Family. And like I said before, what makes the characteristics of this family seem like flaws?Koehler organized this piece very well, however I believe that towards the end she contradicted herself because she created a binary that her personal beliefs included. Not one American has the role to determine what an "All-American Family" is. Every American is apart of an American family; doesn't that make us a large "All-American Family?"Bibliography:"Searching in the Wrong Places" by Heather Koehler

Analysis Of "The Sparrow" Written By Dr. Gardner. Language And Symbols Reveal The Theme Of The Poem

573 words - 2 pages In a world bereft of love, who is there to look to for consolation? Above us all looms a presence far greater than our realm of comprehension, but is He accountable for all? Religion has been believed by many a person throughout history, but all can not count on faith being there during times of need. In "The Sparrow," by Dr. Gardner, the author uses language and symbols to create a theme of lost hope in religion. With situations in time

Review And Analysis Of The Poem "America" By Allen Ginsberg Written As A Lecture, But Is In Essay Format

585 words - 2 pages Allen Ginsberg has been credited "the single greatest influence on the American poetic voice since Whitman", by Bob Dylan himself, and Ginsberg would most probably agree, being his own biggest fan. "America" is typical of Allen Ginsberg in that it's increadibly long. Allen Ginsbergs poems are characteristically long winded and conversational- or monologual- quite unlike the usual style of a poem. He uses peoples full names, and often dedicates