Analysis Of "The Second Great Awakening"

779 words - 3 pages

In "The Christian Movement and the Demand for a Theology of the People," written by Nathan O. Hatch, there are many areas of discussion on the second "Great Awakening" and the effect it had on the people. Many essays have been written about the second "Great Awakening," as it is referred to in the History books, but some can be much more informative than others. The author uses many valid sources and sometimes jumps back and forth between subjects, but he appears to have a massive amount of knowledge pertaining to the Democratic visions of equality. Mr. Hatch states his feelings towards this revolution by saying that it was, at times, pure chaos, and never ending debate over what should and should not be believed in, and that the people had a right to fight for what they wanted to believe in.There are a few sources that make what Hatch is saying appear to be valid and fitting of his essay. For example, '"The Recovery of American Religious History,' American Historical Review" (546) was used as a source when discussing the effect the fast paced social change had on the republic's "structures of religious belief and organization," (546) Also, he used "The Early Relation and Separation of Baptists and Disciples (Chicago, 1904)" (550) by Errett Gates when he was altercating about Alexander Campbell and how he did not take place in the American Revolution. Futhermore, he applied "Religion Follows the Frontier: A History of the Disciples of Christ (New York, 1931)" (561) by Winifred Ernest Garrison when explaining the important factors involved in the Christian movement. This essay would be categorized as a political document because it discusses the Democratic vision of the subject. The historians focus is so widespread, that he covers the big picture by breaking it down into smaller, more understandable sections. The sources can be very helpful when confusion arises in the reader about subject structure.The author of this essay has a democratic bias, which can make it difficult to agree with when the reader has a republican point of view on most aspects of governmental issues. The essay was written in 1980 and the changes that have taken place in the last 25 years have been huge and dramatic. There were wars taking place not too long before this time, which...

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