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Analysis Of The Thesis Of The Age Of Great Dreams By David Farber And American Pastoral By Philip Roth

3167 words - 13 pages

Part I: The 1960’s was a radical decade filled with political tensions, social strife, and overall cultural intrigue. The beginning of the decade allowed for the transition from President Eisenhower to President Kennedy, the youngest President to take office, and the first Roman Catholic. The move represented a shift from a Republican to Democratic administration in the Oval Office. Kennedy became a symbol for the young vibrancy of the American populous, as he was quickly accepted by the grand majority. After Kennedy was assassinated and Lyndon B. Johnson took office, the nation was further engulfed in the war that would come to define America for years to come. The Republican Party regained office as Richard Nixon was elected in his second attempt to run as the decade came to a close. Activists such as Martin Luther King Jr. and Malcom X paved the way for the civil rights movement that swept the nation and captivated the spirit of not only black Americans, but white Americans as well. The race between the United States of America and The Union of Soviet Socialist Republics for domination of space escalated as Kennedy pushed for a man on the moon by the close of the decade, achieved in 1969. The possibility of nuclear war became all too real in 1962 as the launch of nuclear missiles became an abundantly clear possibility. The drug culture emerged in the 1960’s in large part due to the newfound accessibility of illegal drugs, such as marijuana and Lysergic Acid Diethylamide, or LSD. American society was entrenched in the chaotic desire for new, improved highs. The profound ascent of the drug culture was truly realized when the 3-day music festival, Woodstock, took place in 1969, as “sex, drugs and rock n’ roll” symbolized America’s youthful culture throughout the decade.
David Farber took on an undoubtedly strenuous task in writing a book on such a broad and provocative decade. From start to finish, Farber writes to bring to light not only the atrocities of the decade, but the hope that emerged from those who saw the need for change. Farber did not write to glorify the 1960’s, or to misconstrue the perception of the decade, but rather to properly define the aestheticism of society and the difficulty in politics. Farber wrote to quell misconceptions of the decade, including corners that were cut, and any edges that were smoothed, because he does not desire to write a book that contributes to the watering down of historical information.
In writing a book that does not focus on a specific event, but rather something as broad as an entire decade and beyond, the range of topics is extraordinary. The purpose, in the case of Farber’s book, being to properly illustrate and analyze the 1960’s, can be combined with the thesis, purposefully or by accident. The lines are blurred when it comes to the true thesis of a book that’s main purpose is doling out information. However, within the informational timeline always lies a thesis, because a book cannot...

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