Analysis Of Tolkien's The Hobbit

2268 words - 9 pages

J.R.R. Tolkien starts his world renowned book The Hobbit with, “In a hole in the ground there lived a hobbit” (1). This book is a tale of a small hobbit named Bilbo and his ever-memorable journey through the evil world during his time. Living in the Shire, as his homeland is called, it is very calm and pleasant for Bilbo, but once the outer limits of the land are reached Bilbo is in for a great surprise. Needing a burglar on his journey Gandalf the Grey, who is famous for his magic with fire and light, came to ask for Bilbo's assistance. Gandalf was accompanied with thirteen dwarves who were after their long ago taken, but never forgotten treasure. The last evil dragon, Smaug, who overtook the Dwarf Kingdom of Lonely Mountain many years ago, took this desired treasure. Bilbo didn’t want to go, but with his, along with all other hobbits, ability to escape quietly, quickly and easily in the woods and mountains, Bilbo was a perfect burglar for the journey. The adventurous group of now fifteen set off to find trolls, orcs, goblins, wargs, aggressive elves, giant spiders, dragons and numberless natural disasters including wind, snow, rain and scorching heat, None of these obstacles came to be the one most powerful and dangerous enemy to Bilbo and the others, though. This powerful enemy was the greed and lust for the horde of gold and silver and precious jewels that lured the dwarves to pursue it no matter what the cost. And thanks to this and other antagonists Bilbo successfully transformed from a common hobbit to a true hero.
Bilbo was a bit taken off guard and didn't really understand his purpose on this adventure so he demanded some explanations. With the dwarves was Thorin son of Thrain King under the Mountain, as he was known. Thorin was now the rightful King and heir of the treasure of Lonely Mountain for he gave the explanations. Bilbo listened intently as the dwarves sang songs and told poems of their long ago taken land. Singing of “golden hoards” and “long-forgotten gold” Bilbo began to become very enthusiastic about the soon to come journey (22). As the dwarves went on, the hobbit felt that this journey would be good for him. He accepted the task, but not before the Dwarves, along with Gandalf, enchanted the young hobbit with the treasure to be found. Being fairly wealthy Bilbo had no need for this wealth, but before long the hobbit could feel “ the love of beautiful things made by hands and by cunning and by magic moving through him, and a fierce and jealous love, the desire of the hearts of dwarves” (24). Apparently Bilbo is beginning to change from a commoner to a treasure seeker, not quite beginning to become a hero, but change is still change. Soon Bilbo’s transition into a hero will begin, with a rude awakening.
So before Bilbo new what was happening and even before dawn the next morning the troop of fifteen set out. Through the Shire no adventure or trouble was found, but that soon changed. Within a few leagues of the Shire's...

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