Analysis Of The Blue Hotel By Stephen Crane

578 words - 2 pages

Analysis of The Blue Hotel by Stephen Crane

"The Blue Hotel" by Stephen Crane is a story about three travelers passing through Fort Romper, Nebraska. Pat Scully, the owner of the Palace Hotel, draws the men to his hotel that is near the train station. In the hotel the three men meet Johnnie, son of Scully, and agree to play a game of cards with him. During the game, the Swede declares Johnnie as a cheater; this gives rise to a fistfight between Johnnie and the Swede. The Swede wins the fight but leaves the hotel with a false sense of confidence. He goes to a nearby bar and boasts about his victory and eventually gets himself in a fight with a gambler; and Swede eventually is killed. The central idea behind the action in the story is that a person might play a minor role in a terrible act and think that it's ok, but when the outcome is seen it can be that the person who play minor roles may be equal to the persons at large.
There are five main characters in "The Blue Hotel." The most dominant of them is "a shaky and quick-eyed" Swede who acts very nervously and strangely. Pat Scully is a very keen, soft and polite owner of the hotel, who makes sure that his customers are satisfied with him. The third main character is Johnnie -- son of Scully, who is young and enjoys playing cards. "A tall bronzed cowboy" who is very sympathetic towards Johnnie during the fistfight, is yet another main character. Perhaps the least dominant main character is the Easterner; he is a quiet and soft-spoken person.
The main conflict in the story is the fistfight over a card in which the Swede accuses...

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