Analysis: The Explorer By Gwendolyn Brooks And Fredrick Douglass By Robert Hayden

1456 words - 6 pages

The world we live is in no ways perfect. Our world is littered with pride and greed. We want money and to advance in our life and in some ways we forget the people we walk over. It is about the money and it doesn’t matter who gets in our way. Most people also have a problem with admitting their mistakes. The United States of America was at one time a country that on the outside seemed to be perfect, but in truth it had dark secrets. It held slaves for hundreds of years and once they were emancipated the world turned to other means. Releasing the slaves gave the people freedom according to the Constitution, but they were never truly free. The people had fought all of their lives. Caucasian people still had this idea that they were better because of the color of their skin. Slavery was still a part of the world, but instead of being held in chains their individuality was taken away. They couldn’t be or do what they wanted because they were forced to live and do what and how the white people wanted. No matter how hard it got, they still had hope. They knew that their ancestors had succeeded and that if they continued to try they would succeed. In The Explorer by Gwendolyn Brooks and Fredrick Douglass by Robert Hayden show in three way hoe people were hurt, but also the wants of the people: freedom, hope and individuality.
Hayden described how freedom was one of the ways the people suffered and one of the major things that the human truly wanted. Freedom is given to us by the constitution, but it doesn’t always mean what is exactly said. They are free on paper, but there are people who are segregated and secluded. “Points to the contradictions inherent in our American notion, our American rhetoric , of freedom: which, while "beautiful" for some, has always been "terrible" for many. -that one of the primary functions of a rhetoric of "freedom" is to make invisible the oppression on which that "freedom" depends.” (Gay) In an essence, they were no better off. In truth some would say that they were worse off. They appreciate being free and receiving money, but in the end they weren’t perfect. Their freedom was only true on paper, because of the place they live in they have limited opportunity to advance. White people put them into a position where they could barely get a job. They were slaves in a different sense. White people still saw them as slaves and people who needed to be controlled. They were misunderstood and people jumped to conclusion. “Is it so bad, then, to be misunderstood? Pythagoras was misunderstood, and Socrates, and Jesus, and Luther, and Copernicus, and Galileo, and Newton, and every pure and wise spirit that ever took flesh. To be great is to be misunderstood.” (Emerson) Being misunderstood wasn’t the worse part. These people were faced with getting something that they had been waiting for all their life and then at the last moment they realized it wasn’t what they wanted. They wanted the written freedom, but they didn’t want...

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