Analysys Of Charlotte Gilman's "The Yellow Wallpaper."

987 words - 4 pages

Dear Mr. Scudder:I wholeheartedly disagree with you, Mr. Scudder, on your position of not publishing Charlotte Gilman's wonderful story, "The Yellow Wallpaper." "The Yellow Wallpaper," isn't a story which would "[make] others miserable." Rather, it's an inspiring story for young women to break free from the patriarchal shackles which confine them. This story's underlying feminist themes prove to be quite fascinating, and thus this story deserves to be published in the Atlantic Monthly for the masses to enjoy. Because our society is still dominated by much unfair masculine oppression, we need to break free from this mindset and strive for feminine equality. Ultimately, I feel that you should reconsider publishing Gilman's story, for it's predominant feminist tones, as seen through the room itself, the woman behind the wallpaper, and John's untimely collapse, amalgamate to form a truly captivating story.One of the most intriguing themes presented in Charlotte Gilman's "The Yellow Wallpaper" proves to be the underlying feminist tones which dominate the story, as seen through the nursery itself. The story is an exemplification of a young woman's life and her struggle to escape the fascist dominance of a patriarchal society, a theme which can intriguingly be seen as correlating with Gilman's own life. From the opening of the story, Jane is oppressed by her tyrannical husband, John, who confines her to an old, empty nursery. The windows of the nursery are barred, making it not only a childhood retreat but also a prison. While John confines Jane to her bed, the bed is nailed to the floor, further confining Jane in a static position. The nursery additionally has important significance, for the author is stating the Jane is being treated like a little child, even when she has a child of her own. Furthermore, the nursery is described in several contrasting sequential statements, such as, "The most beautiful place!...I don't like our room a bit." This contradiction of sensory detail is an intriguing literary device used by Gilman in order to express the overturning roles of women. Women were previously thought to be merely beautiful and obedient. However, Gilman exemplifies that as attain more freedom and the "wallpaper is being torn down," women are beginning to contradict their prior social roles. Thus, the nursery is a key symbol of the rising feminist notions present in the story, an assertion further seen through the woman behind the wallpaper.As Jane continues her therapy, she soon identifies completely with the woman behind the wallpaper who tries to break free from the domesticated prison of the wallpaper by moonlight. During the day, the woman is forced to hide in the wallpaper, much like Jane who is trapped in her room while the sun still shines. However, as the sun falls and darkness approaches, the woman tears free from the paper's confines and is free to creep around unseen, only creeping in the dark. "It is the same woman, I know, for she is...

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