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Analytical Review Of Aldous Huxley's "Brave New World" ... Explaining Through The Use Of Literary Techniques Such As Satire And Irony

1248 words - 5 pages

Aldous Huxley, an appraised English writer and author, was born on July 26, 1894. He grew up to become one of the most outstanding members of the famous Huxley family, with a writer and professional herbalist for a father, a prominent 19th century English naturalist for a grandfather, and a noted biologist for a brother. Graduating in 1916 with First Class Honors from Balliol College, Oxford in English literature, he completed his first unpublished novel at the age of seventeen. In 1932, Huxley wrote Brave New World, one of the most challenged books in English classrooms between 1990 and 2000.Written while he was living in France and England, Brave New World was Huxley's first attempt at a utopian novel, a "negative utopia" as he referred to it. He was inspired by H.G. Wells' optimistic vision of the future in "Men Like Gods" to write a complete parody of that same novel, one where he would go to extremes to offer a frightening take on society in the future.In general, Brave New World was Huxley's prospect on what kind of society would exist if the government were to take control of everything, especially civilization, while doing this along industrial principles. Science plays a big role in the book, even though, in the 1930's, science was rather primitive when compared to today. The novel depicts a utopia where society is carefree, healthy and technologically sophisticated. Characteristics of undesirable societies, such as warfare, poverty and disease have been eradicated, and now, people are born into a hedonistic society that finds pleasure in promiscuous sex and government-impelled drug use. The irony in this "perfect society" stems from the actions taken by the government to achieve such a "World State", and these include eliminating things integral in humanity's nature and identity, such as family, culture, art, literature, science, religion and philosophy. Also, another ironic twist to this "utopia" is the government's deliberate and effortlessly enforced social stratification. This is done to maintain stability throughout the entire society.What I find the most ironic is that even though this is the government's version of a utopian society, where happiness and stability are favored on truth, and members of that society have lost touch of a sense of individuality and humanity, the outcomes are accepted by society with no attempts at defying the system. Personal freedom is completely lost, yet understandably, this is due to the government's methods of force-feeding people in a society marred by conformity. A loss of personal freedom puts an end to any perfect world, in my opinion.The means used by the government to maintain this stability are rigorously achieved through medical and scientific technologies developed to control society. One such method (found in Chapter One) is the strict control of reproduction by growing babies in a lab, biologically engineering them through an artificial life machine until maturation, and also submitting...

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