Antebellum Period In The South Essay

743 words - 3 pages

In the South during the antebellum period, slave holders in the south defended the institution of slavery using social/political, religious/ideological, economic, and even scientific evidence to defend slavery, nearer to the end of slavery they were more fervent in their defense of slavery because as they years went on the abolitionists of the north were more fervent in abolishing slavery. Earlier, closer to that start of the antebellum period, they simply claimed that slavery was a political evil not a crime, and thus should not need to end. Slavery was a profitable business and it was around for a long time so southerners did not want to do away with it. Latter on during the antebellum period the bible was used to justify slavery, saying that God approved of the institution of slavery. They even used science in an attempt to justify slavery; it was said that African slaves were not the same species as European and Asian men, because their bone structure was different.
During the antebellum period slavery had already been around for over 200 years, and became an integral part of southern society. Slaveholders were viewed as the top of the social ladder, and those that did not have slaves looked forward to the day that they themselves would be able to afford/ own slaves. Thus even those southerners who did not own slaves defended the institution of slavery, because they wanted to be slaveholders. There were even reported cases in which freed slaves owned slaves themselves. Early in the antebellum period it was stated that slavery was viewed upon as a political evil by the people of the southern states, however it was not looked upon as a crime (doc. A). John C. Calhoun, had said in a speech to the U.S. Senate in 1837 that slavery was necessary because they had in every wealthy and civilized society up to date, had a portion of the population (slaveholders) live on the labor of others (slaves), he said that the institution of slavery was a positive good, not an evil, (doc. H).
In the 1850s southerners used ideological/religious arguments to justify the institution of slavery. They used Gen. ix: 25,...

Find Another Essay On Antebellum Period in the South

Reforms: The Antebellum Period Before the Civil War

947 words - 4 pages The antebellum period before the Civil War was one of rapid changes in American society. During this time, Americans began to feel a growing belief in human goodness and perfection, resulting in a new commitment to improve the character of people. Many reformers developed their enthusiasm for the cause from religion. The Second Great Awakening encouraged a lively evangelicalism to spread throughout the country, inspiring these modern idealists

Confliction in the Antebellum Union Essay

873 words - 4 pages Conflicts of ideals in the newly “freed” United States increased during the antebellum era, ultimately because of the long-driven question of freedom and liberty. Many people believed that to be free and have liberty was to be able to own land and property. This brought on the idea of the “freedom” to take the land that the Native Americans had been living on and the spreading of the institution of slavery. These issues both lead to an eventual

"The Antebellum South: The Slave Stories of William Wells Brown"

994 words - 4 pages The ante-bellum period was an age of racism and an age of suffering. The author of the account entitled "A Narrative" was William Wells Brown. Brown was one of seven children; however, no two of them were of the same father. Brown's mother was a woman by the name of Elizabeth, and his father was a Mr. George Higgins: a white relative of Brown's first owner. William Wells Brown was born in Lexington, Kentucky. While his birth date was unbeknownst

Analysis of the Two Periods of Antebellum South Carolina

1880 words - 8 pages Antebellum South Carolina was a period considered to be between 1790 and the American civil war in 1861. In 1786 the cotton gin was created causing the cotton industry to increase its labor demand due to the increased harvest size on the plantations. Not only was the cotton industry in high demand but also so was rice harvesting causing South Carolina to become a heavily slave populated state. Image A and B both represent two periods of

The Antebellum period. Speaks of what was happening in pre-Civil War time, reasons for the war, and differences between the Northern, and Southern states

1588 words - 6 pages The purpose of this essay is to show what was happening in pre-Civil War time. To show the reasons for the war. To show the differences between the Northern, and Southern states.The antebellum period started with the Industrial Revolution. The Industrial Revolution was brought to the United States by Samuel Slater from England in the late 18th century. He was a textile worker who actually founded the American cotton textile industry.This

Pain in the South

654 words - 3 pages Slave narratives offered a great insight into the lives of the slaves. Many former slaves offered their stories to express their troubles from when they were in repression. To further the abolitionist cause, former slaves wrote narratives about their lives in bondage, so that they could express the destruction slavery caused for the slaves as well as their owners, the Southern religion, and the entire antebellum South. The constraints caused

Slaves in the South

1963 words - 8 pages strong comparison between those of the population who invested in the slave labor market in 1850 and those who invested in the stock market in 1949. In the first half of the article Olsen sets up the arguments he is going to challenge by showing what historians from the antebellum US through the present, believed the distribution of slaves in the South to be, and also by showing the supposed economic and political effects of this distribution

Secession in the South

562 words - 2 pages the safety of the people, sometimes when the government has that kind of power to make people follow certain things they should not have to follow, many issues arise. In the late 1800’s, many issues emerged between the South and the Union on whether the Southern states had the right to secede from the United States. The Southern states did have the right to secede because of political, economical, and social reasons. These reasons include numerous

Barbecue in the South

827 words - 4 pages On a humid afternoon in Georgia as you peacefully rock in your rocking chair you are approached with the irresistible scent of fresh barbecue, and sweet hickory chips. As the scent lingers on, you can’t help but crave a plate of this comfort food. To those in America, this is known as Barbecue. Barbecue has been a staple food of the south for as long as anyone can recall. Not only does barbecue taste good but it helps bring people together to

In The South

874 words - 4 pages Living in the South Growing up in the south during the civil right movement between the late fifties and early sixties as an African American was tough. As a black person you went through a lot of racial profiling, discrimination and of course racism throughout the south just because they wanted a change and was tired of being miss treated by the whites. Superiority meant a lot to the whites so; they were not going to allow the blacks to take

Slavery in the South

1191 words - 5 pages Slavery in the South Slavery of the Black man in America was the cruelest ever known to man. Europeans transported slaves from Africa as early as 1505. The African Slaves were first exploited on an island named Hispaniola, in the Caribbean by the Europeans to do labor work, before they were sent to the Americas. The women usually worked the interior cooking and cleaning while the men were sent out into the plantation fields to farm. These

Similar Essays

A Response To Slavery In The Antebellum South

837 words - 4 pages The chapter “Slavery in the Antebellum South” depicts life inside the antebellum slave market through the eyes of "soul drivers" and those they enslaved. Depending on who was asked, slaveholders were either "men of humanity" or "slave drivers". Slaves were considered nothing more than “commodities”, mere pieces of property. At the end of the day, the mutually beneficial relationship existing between the slave and his owner was one that would

Supreme Court Rulings During The Antebellum Period

723 words - 3 pages The antebellum period was filled with important Supreme Court rulings that had an influential impact on the U.S. The case of Dred Scott vs. Sandford is a perfect example of a ruling that highly affected the U.S. In Dred Scott vs. Sandford the Supreme Court ruled that African Americans, whether a slave or free, were not American citizens and were unable to sue in federal court. The Court also ruled that Congress did not have the power to ban

The Role Women Played In The Social Reform Movements Of The Antebellum Period

2205 words - 9 pages The Role Women Played in the Social Reform Movements of the Antebellum Period Comprehending the lives of American women and their roles is fundamental for understanding the entire antebellum period in America. The period 1820 to 1870 in the United States was marked by a forceful and widespread debate on woman's roles and their proper vocation whether this be in the home or outside the home and becoming wage earners.This

Born In Bondage: Growing Up Enslaved In The Antebellum South By Marie Jenkins Schwartz

900 words - 4 pages Born in BondageChildren in the Antebellum South were very important to both the slave families and the owners of these slave families. Many things were vital in the raising of a slave child and the parents did their best to fulfill these duties. One of these duties was Nurturing. Every child needs attention and love in order to grow up healthy and this was one thing that slave parents tried to supply their children with. Second was discipline