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Ap Us History Paper On Brown V. Board Of Education Of Topeka, Kansas Supreme Court Case

1253 words - 5 pages

Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, Kansas Supreme Court CaseThe Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, Kansas Supreme Court case in 1954 revolved around the issue of equality between black and white children in segregated schools. It was the result of a long-standing legal campaign carried on by the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) and the Legal Defense Fund (LDF), to resolve the effects of Jim Crow laws, which segregated public facilities based on race throughout many southern states. The case was held under a liberal court, led by Chief Justice Earl Warren, beginning in 1954. He was an activist, which meant that he supported giving rights to the individual. The decision of the case was a strict interpretation of the Constitution1. The Supreme Court made a good decision in ruling unanimously to end racial segregation in public schools. In the many cases that followed The Brown v. Board of Education case, it set an example and inspired change to occur in reaction to racial profiling; however ending racial segregation does not mean it ended America's attitude in respect to race relations. What the case was able to achieve was that, through altering the history of black public institutions and achievements of African-Americans by normalizing individuals through constitutional law, the Supreme Court helped reinforce a broader agreement about individual happiness. The Brown v. Board of Education Supreme Court Case laid the foundation for shaping future national and international policies regarding human rights.The case first began when a young African-American student named Linda Brown, who was eight at the time, had to cross Topeka, Kansas to attend grade school. While her white friends were able to attend public school a few blocks away, Linda and her sister Terry Lynn, had to walk through the Rock Island Railroad Switchyard to get to the bus stop for the ride to the all-black Monroe School. Her father Oliver Brown felt it bogus that his daughter had to walk so far in order to go to school when there was a closer one a few blocks away, the Sumner School, which was an all-white public school. After being fed up with his daughter's long trip to school and getting refused to enroll his daughter at the white children's school, Oliver Brown took his case to the NAACP, which then began one of the most important Supreme Court cases of the U.S. Constitutional History.The Browns sued the Board of Education of Topeka claiming that the segregated school system deprived Linda Brown of the equal protection of the laws required under the Fourteenth Amendment. The Constitutional question put before the Supreme Court was: "Does segregation of children in public schools solely on the bases of race even though the physical facilities and other 'tangible' factors may be equal, deprive the children of the minority group of equal educational opportunities?" The Supreme Court referred to the Fourteenth Amendment, Section 1, which...

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