Appeasement And How It Changed By The Start Of The Second World War

986 words - 4 pages

From 1938, Appeasement to Hitler seemed to be quite successful in the beginning and soon Chamberlain has changed it. It started because the result of WWI, which made Britain not wanting another war. In the beginning, Chamberlain thought the Treaty of Versailles was too harsh to Germany. Then as Germany got stronger, their reason has changed, the new reasons for appeasing Hitler was, firstly, it gave UK time to prepare for a war as its main soldiers were abroad to take control over their colonies. Secondly, it gave Britain the high morale ground to say they did everything to prevent a war. Thirdly, Britain and France were both weak from WWI, its military was not as strong as before. Fourthly, the "Peace Movement" was very influencing in Britain, no citizens wanted another war and as it was a democratic country, Chamberlain himself couldn't decide to go for a war or not. There were also quite many reasons that made Chamberlain to do nothing, for example, Hitler promised that Sudetenland would be the last demand and many British people trusted him, including Chamberlain himself.

However, the events in Europe pressured Chamberlain to abandon appeasement. Chamberlain's policy from 1938 was to appease Hitler's Germany and trust him, however, it changed suddenly in late 1939. Until then, he had done nothing to stop Hitler's demands. Even though, firstly, it made Hitler stronger by having more population and natural resources. Secondly, humiliated Britain as it seemed to have listened everything what Hitler said to do and never oppose to him, no countries trusted them. Thirdly, Britain seemed to have sent millions of people to be ruled under Hitler when they agreed him to have so much land. From 1938, he had appeased to Hitler on several occasions. They include breaking the Treaty of Versailles to rearm Germany by rebuilding its army and introducing conscription in 1935. Marching 22,000 soldiers into Rhineland in March 7, 1936. Invading Austria on March 11, 1938. Munich Agreement, September 29 1938, to give Sudetenland to Hitler, which he called to be the last territorial demands. However, from late 1938, his policy has changed as when Hitler took over the whole Czech and Chamberlain thought it was enough and promised to protect Poland on March 15, 1939. Britain saw how Hitler's airplanes fought in Spain to help Franco, which was very scary, and knew they need to develop the air-defense system. Later, some provocative agreements were signed, Pact of Steel between Hitler and Mussolini in May 22, Nazi-Soviet Non Aggression Pact between Stalin and Hitler. These events in Europe pressured Chamberlain to abandon appeasement.

Events in Britain also pressured Chamberlain into abandoning appeasement when he and his policy...

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