Aquatic Ape Theory Essay

1613 words - 7 pages

Around five to seven million years ago in Africa, a man/ape primate ventured about in the wooded areas. (Morgan, 1982) “My thesis is that a branch of this primitive ape-stock was forced by competition from life in the trees to feed on the sea-shores and to hunt for food, shellfish, sea-urchins etc.”, quoted from Alister Hardy. For the need of food, shelter, space, and resources, the hominid relocated from its traditional environment of the tree, toward water. As evident today, many species of monkeys and apes seek these resources in trees. According to Elaine Morgan, the man/ape primates that stayed and continued to survive in the wooded environment millions of years ago, are the direct ...view middle of the document...

Structurally, humans and land mammals don’t have that much in common. They have big ears placed high so they can here over long distances. A slender body allows them to reach high speeds, and their feet are designed to put weight on thin hooves. Humans naturally have plenty of fat tissues under their skin, and their wide, flat feet are more likely to be cut on rocks. (Westrup, 2002) These multiple similarities of humans with aquatic organism and the environmental situation of the time, greatly suggest and helps proves that AAT best fits the explanations of the man/ape primate evolutionary split.
The Aquatic Ape Theory explains the start of human evolution on the bases of basic evolutionary terms established by Charles Darwin. As explained earlier, the theory states that humans traveled from the wooded area toward water. In doing this, humans adapted to the new aquatic environment, dealing with survival of the fittest and geographic isolation which caused speciation. Speciation is the evolutionary processes through which new species arise from existing species. Part of the hominid that stayed in the woods, are the organisms that evolved into the ape primates that we know today such as the chimpanzee and bonobo monkey. While the other part of the man/ape primates relocated to the water, this is the speciation of the human evolutionary line. When the early start of the human line moved to the water, they changed from the life of gathering and surviving in the trees to gathering and wading in the water. The AAT uses the facts and features of today’s humans to theorize what happened in the past.
Humans are much more intellectual than the ape primates of today and also have many distinct features that set humans apart from ape primates. (Morgan, 1982) Humans have webbing between their digits, ability to walk upright, little amount of hair, sweat glands, the ability to birth an offspring under water, downward facing nostrils, and subcutaneous fat. All of these changes occurred slowly over time until the man/ape primate evolved into a similar idea of what today’s humans looks like.
According to the theory, five to seven million years ago some hominids moved toward the water. They started eating fish and other sea organisms. The start of eating sea organisms caused an increase in brain function; this development is an important distinction between humans and apes today. (Verhaegen, 2010) The search for food in the water also drove them to wading in the water. Soon the primates started to stay in the water longer and longer until the need for land ended. This prolonged lifestyle led to many adaptations. Slowly all these adaptations came to change the once land and tree life creatures into aquatic man-like organisms. Although not sure around what time or the cause, millions of years ago some of these aquatic man organisms found the need to travel back on to the land. Eventually, they evolved back to land life and developing into the organism called...

Find Another Essay On aquatic ape theory

platypus Essay

2459 words - 10 pages change occurs The Theory of Natural Selection Within a population there is variety. Some members of the population contain desirable characteristics for the environment and therefore are more likely to survive and reproduce. These features are passed on to offspring and over time, are spread throughout the population. 8.5.2.3 Identify and describe evidence of changing environments in Australia over millions of years 8.5.2.5 Identify

platypus Essay

2459 words - 10 pages change occurs The Theory of Natural Selection Within a population there is variety. Some members of the population contain desirable characteristics for the environment and therefore are more likely to survive and reproduce. These features are passed on to offspring and over time, are spread throughout the population. 8.5.2.3 Identify and describe evidence of changing environments in Australia over millions of years 8.5.2.5 Identify

Charles Darwin Was Not the First to Develop a Theory of Evolution

4874 words - 19 pages like, humble elements. The French Philosopher Montesquieu described his belief that all present species had descended from a relatively few number of ancient species. Maillet (1656-1738), the French Consul and philosopher of note, preceded Darwin by well over a century with his theory that the land animals developed from creatures that formerly lived in the ocean depths. In his Telliamed he wrote that life first began with aquatic beings that

When the Bubble Burst

1539 words - 6 pages By the time I arrived state side from my second tour in the Middle East the housing bubble had already burst. I noticed a drastic change in the way that many of my friends and family were living. Several of my friends that worked in real estate had sold their boats and seconds houses. My own stock portfolio had lost a third of its value. My sister and her husband had defaulted on their home mortgage leaving them scrambling for a place to live. I

phase diagram

4456 words - 18 pages Introduction: Chemical equilibrium is a crucial topic in Chemistry. To represent and model equilibrium, the thermodynamic concept of Free energy is usually used. For a multi-component system the Gibbs free energy is a function of Pressure, Temperature and quantity (mass, moles) of each component. If one of these parameters is changed, a state change to a more energetically favorable state will occur. This state has the lowest free energy

Revolutionary Work of Art

1890 words - 8 pages unchanged picture of reality, while benefiting from the effects of technology. As technology is progressing, the artistic movement is also progressing and so is the way masses receive information from the film while they evaluate it as art. Works Cited Benjamin, Walter. "The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction," Benjamin, Walter. "The Work of Art in the Age of Its Technological Reproducibility." The Norton Anthology of Theory and Criticism. 2nd ed. New York: W.W. Norton &, 2010. 1051-1071

Enlightenment Thought in New Zealand Schools

1594 words - 6 pages opposite of each other. Social-democracy believed in the interests of the group over the individual, and the Liberal-democracy believed in the individual over the group. (Lecture notes, 22 March 2006). The social-democracy was informed by the capitalist economic system. This Marxist economic theory as stated in Rata (2001) believes that wealth and/or profit is produced by the labour force, which use the means of production and resources of the

Psychological Egoism Theory

2240 words - 9 pages The theory of psychological egoism is indeed plausible. The meaning of plausible in the context of this paper refers to the validity or the conceivability of the theory in question, to explain the nature and motivation of human behavior (Hinman, 2007). Human actions are motivated by the satisfaction obtained after completing a task that they are involved in. For example, Mother Teresa was satisfied by her benevolent actions and

How Celtic Folkore has Influenced My Family

1587 words - 6 pages Every family has a unique background that influences the way they live and interact with other people. My parents, who emigrated from Ireland to the States with my three brothers in 1989, brought over their own Celtic folklore and traditions that have helped shaped the way our family operates and lives. One aspect of folklore that has helped shape my family dynamic is the Celtic cross—both its background and what role it has played in our lives

Julia Margaret Cameron

1406 words - 6 pages At a time when women were looked upon as being homemakers, wives, mothers and such the late 1850's presented a change in pace for one woman in specific. Photography was discovered in 1826 and soon after the phenomenon of photography was being experimented with and in turn brought new and different ways of photo taking not only as documenting real time, but also conceptualizing a scene in which an image would be taken. Julia Margaret Cameron will

Evaluation of School Improvement

1403 words - 6 pages Georgiaville Middle School, November, 2011. Nolan, J. F. (2008). Teacher supervision and evaluation: Theory into practice 2nd ed. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Son, Inc. Oliva, P. (2009). Developing the curriculum for educational management corporation. Garland, TX: Addison Wesley. Wang, S., & Hsua, H. (2008). Reflections on using blogs to expand in-class discussion. TechTrends, 52(3), 81-85. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com/docview/223124027?accountid=34899

Similar Essays

Solution Paper

2411 words - 10 pages animals living in this area are covered in hair and walk on four legs. None of these adaptations are seen in humans. The Aquatic Ape Theory of evolution states that humans evolved from the sea and had an aquatic era. Basically, it is the idea that our ancestors were trapped in a semi-aquatic environment and over time, altering their bodies to be more effective in the water. Physiologically speaking, our features are rare in comparison to land

Solution Paper

2411 words - 10 pages animals living in this area are covered in hair and walk on four legs. None of these adaptations are seen in humans. The Aquatic Ape Theory of evolution states that humans evolved from the sea and had an aquatic era. Basically, it is the idea that our ancestors were trapped in a semi-aquatic environment and over time, altering their bodies to be more effective in the water. Physiologically speaking, our features are rare in comparison to land

The Aquatic Ape Hypothesis (Aah) Essay

2690 words - 11 pages outcompete other terrestrial animals, but retained the adaptations we had gained during our time in the water (Ellis 2011; Hardy 1960; Langdon 1997). Proponents sometimes use the title aquatic ape theory, rather then hypothesis, suggesting greater credibility. However, the idea simply does not have the evidence to be considered a scientific theory. The AAH is still just as it was in 1960, “only a speculation - an hypothesis to be discussed and tested

Homo Aquaticus? Essay

1832 words - 7 pages believe that the differences between human and ape brains are shown through man's ability to use tools and language. This traditional view cannot explain why only human ancestors developed these motor skills and language abilities, that is, why nonhuman primates and other savannah mammals didn't develop these abilities. The solution may lie in the aquatic theory of human evolution, the theory that explains why humans don't have fur, and why we