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Archetypal Review Of The Lion, The Witch, And The Wardrobe

733 words - 3 pages

Through a magical doorway, past the golden thrones, The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe was created by C.S. Lewis, in 1950, in England. Over the course of the past 64 years, this book has become one of the most famous books in the world. Lewis was “one of the most commercially successful authors” (The Life & Faith of C.S. Lewis: The Magic Never Ends). The hidden archetypes and intricate themes in this book are what sets it apart from others.
The theme of this book is fantasy. Fantasy, in a sense, does not connect with reality. While imagination, on the other hand, is based off of events from reality. This book is considered to be such a theme because of Lucy’s discovery of the magical world of Narnia inside the wardrobe. She walked inside to find moth balls and fur coats. As she ventured further into the wardrobe, she soon discovered pine needles, coldness, and snow at her feet. An entirely different world was lain out before her. How strange it must’ve been for Lucy to discover such a thing! As the story goes on, the four children meet several characters who all happen to be talking animals. This is where the theme of fantasy applies!
As you read this book, your mind simply flourishes. With each word read, colorful images form in your mind of what each scene would look like. Color is a very important symbol in this book. For example, the color red signifies danger and consequence. The red woolen muffler that Mr. Tumnus bears signifies that he is a danger. He wasn’t a danger to Lucy, but by interacting with Lucy, he became a danger to himself. His home was ransacked by Jadis’ Secret Police and he was taken away to her castle. The lips of the dreaded White Witch also symbolize danger. As for another example, the color green signifies the beginning of a new life. Aslan’s return caused the turn of a new season. After what seemed like it would be an eternal winter, the snow began to melt and revealed velvet green grass. “This is no thaw,” said the dwarf, suddenly stopping. “This is spring. What are we to do? Your winter has been...

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