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Aristotle's Influences On Biology Essay

610 words - 3 pages

Science has taken huge steps to get to where it is today. Throughout the ages biology has developed from focusing on medicine and natural history, to great scientific advantages such as the theory of evolution, classifying living organisms and decoding every strand of DNA in the human body. Biology is the study of life, and all living organisms. The first known biologists were Hippocrates of Kas and Galen of Pergamum, who helped with the understanding of anatomy and physiology. Philosophy is the study of a basis of a particular branch of knowledge or experience. Aristotle was not only a great philosopher, but also of the world’s first biologist, and set the bar for every scientist that came after him.
“Aristotle was born in 384 B.C.E. in a small town named Stagirus in Macedonia, part of what is now modern day Greece. His mother’s name was Phaestis, whose family was very wealthy. Aristotle’s father was a young doctor named Nicomachus, who traveled around the countryside, treating patients who needed care. His father began to spend more time in Macedonia before Aristotle was born, and discovered that it offered better working conditions there. Eventually, he attracted the attention of the king- Amyntas III who then appointed him as his own personal court doctor. They then moved to the capital city of Pella. Aristotle grew up here in the king’s court. While here Aristotle developed a close friendship with the king’s son Phillip. By watching his dad he learned about anatomy, biology, and the way nature works. (“Aristotle Philosopher 23-26)”
Aristotle was around seventeen when he joined Plato’s Academy. He stayed at the academy for almost twenty years. Although he respected Plato, he was uncomfortable with Plato’s philosophy. “After Plato died Aristotle was passed over for the headship of the...

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