Arthur Miller's "Death Of A Salesman"

778 words - 3 pages

In Arthur Miller'sThe Death of a Salesman, I believe the meaning of the title was beyond the physical death of the salesman, but more the death of character and integrity of the salesman. The play is based around the character Willy Loeman, a washed up, burned out, salesman who's life is currently in shambles. He escapes this meaningless existence throughout the play through flashbacks of memories past. He also has strong suicidal thoughts and tendencies.I feel the first flashback at the start of the play really gives a clue as to what's going through Willy's mind. He comes into his home telling his wife of how he was driving with the windshield down and the wind in his face, enjoying the air, when he drifted off in thought and started to drive off the road. He shortly recalls his car doesn't have a windshield you can take off, that's only on old cars, like his 1928 Chevy. I feel for him to be able to take the windshield off and being able to drive with the wind in his face is of symbolizes a happy, care free state of being. This state is something that for Willy, has disappeared over time, and is no more than a memory. Maybe his discontent with life, has brought him to remember his once care free state.Willy has a wife and two son's Happy, and Biff. He has a very bad relationship with Biff, they constantly argue and Biff is always saying how he hates his father. I felt each were difficult with the other because of disappoints on the other's part. For instance it seemed as though Willy continually built his son up in his mind, and that to him, Biff was gold and would be a great salesman. But Biff didn't believe in the nonsense of buying, selling, and "working 50 weeks a year for 2 weeks vacation", and would let his father down a lot by not following his father's dream.Biff appears to be a dreamer. He likes the idea of a care free life. He doesn't see purpose in working your life to end up like his father who is a rambling, delusional, fool. He speaks many times of taking his shirt off and feeling the wind and sun....

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