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Astonishing Imagery In Wilfred Owen's Poem, Dulce Et Decorum Est

522 words - 2 pages

The poem ‘Dulce et Decorum Est’ by Wilfred Owen portrays the horrors of World War I with the horrific imagery and the startling use of words he uses. He describes his experience of a gas attack where he lost a member of his squadron and the lasting impact it had on him. He describes how terrible the conditions were for the soldiers and just how bad it was. By doing this he is trying to help stop other soldiers from experiencing what happened in a shortage of time.

Owen opens his poem with a strong simile that compares the soldiers to old people that may be hunch-backed. ‘Bent double, like old beggars like sacks.’ ‘like sacks’ suggests the image that the soldiers are like homeless people at the side of a street that is all dirty. This highlights that the clothes they were wearing were all torn and didn’t have very many items of clothing with them. The soldiers were not clean as they couldn’t wash with clean water when at battle. The quote Owen uses doesn’t at all describe how the soldiers now a day would be like.

Owen continues to describe the conditions of the soldiers when he reveals they ‘limped on, blood-shod.’ This strong wording tells the reader how drastic the actions at battle were. ‘Limped on’ suggests that the men were just tropping along, many with no boots on. The soldiers feet must have been throbbing as their must have been lots of stones, rocks and un-even ground at the combat zone. ‘Blood shod’ shows that the soldiers were either injured...

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