Attachment And Separation Essay

675 words - 3 pages

Cut the apron string is allowing young infants to grow-up and be independent. Some culture believe in this this behavior while others don’t agree with it. An example of cut the apron string: Now, that Todd is eighteen his mom expect him to get a job and move out her house. Todd mother believe she has done everything she needed to do to help him. Todd mom wants Todd to get a job and because independent. This is an example of cut the apron string.
When infants are born they depend solely on adults. They need adults to change their diapers, feed them, and clean them. Infants get attached to people who take care of them. Parents are able to cut the strings when they take care of their children. Cutting the string help the children develop independence. For the parent who don’t cut the string their children are allowed to stay with them as long as they like. The parent would like for their children to live with them forever. “The parent-child ties are permanent rather than transitory”(Gonzalez-Mena, 2008).
Cut the string on an apron is really depends on cultural values. Some cultures feel that family should be attached and close to each other. Nate mother feel that he should live with her after he gets married. Nate enjoy staying with his family. However, his new wife wants them to look for their own home. Nate wife feel they have live there long enough and that they can take care of themselves now. You can tell that Nate family is a family that doesn’t cut the apron string. Furthermore, his wife has a different outlook on culture values and behavior.
2.What survival practices are always related to cultural values?
Cultural values are related to the protection of children. Parents should provide protection for their children. This mean that the parents should give their children a safe place to live, provide children with medical assistance, and keep them from being harmed. Infant care practice is valued through different cultures. People of all culture...

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