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Australia Was A Better Place In Which To Live For Women In 1945 Than It Was In 1900.' Discuss This Statement With Reference To The Status Of Women.

1752 words - 7 pages

It is evident that overall Australia was a better place to live for women in 1945 than it was in 1900. Throughout our history white settlement in Australia has influenced the role of women within society up until the beginning of the 20th Century. "During the convict period men out numbered women four to one," although the Australian convict period dates back to the 1800's, the fact that women were out numbered to men greatly impacted their position and way in which they were viewed in society. As a result of this, for the early part of the 1900's women were discriminated against. During this era women really worked together and stood up for their rights, for the first time in our history. Despite some reservations and social expectations women were able to emancipate themselves from the restrictions and expectations placed on them, showing that they did have a voice which, deserved to be heard. This is shown through their fashion, politics, women's rights & education, wages & employment, and two World Wars which influenced the positions of females in society between 1900 and 1945.Fashion throughout the twentieth Century played a huge role in portraying the new freedoms experienced by women within Australian Society. As the roles of women became more significant and defined, their fashion became more daring. In the 1900's women wore long dresses that would not allow any of their ankle to be revealed. When going out they always wore hats and gloves. Most women had long hair and wore it up in pins. "World War One changed women's clothing styles" "Women's dress became simpler as they took on 'men's jobs.'" During the 1910's many women worked toward both social and political equality. Skirts progressively became shorter, slowly revealing the ankles, causing females to wear lighter shoes instead of boots. Corsets were adapted significantly so that they became more functional. With the 1920's came the era of the "flappers" - women who wore simple tubular dresses, allowing their legs to be seen above ankle length, this caused women to wear more 'flattering shoes'. During this period women cut their hair much shorter, to about their chin, to accommodate their new dress sense and make a statement about their small, but yet profound new independences. By 1935 women began to wear pants for the very first time. They also wore skirts that were pleated and dresses with padded shoulders, length of skirts now reached just below the knee. In the 1940's women's clothing became much plainer due to the Second World War. Clothing now accommodated small waists, billowing skirts to the knees, and padded hips, gloves and hats were worn when going out. Fashion is a clear indication of the public attitudes of the time period. As women reasserted their position in society their dress sense became more practical and daring to accommodate their new way of life.Female entrance into politics and voting was a very significant route in their journey to equality. "In 1902...

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