Australian Aboriginal Technology Essay

615 words - 2 pages

Thousands of years ago, the indigenous Aboriginals of Australia collected food and were hunting in order to survive. To take some effort out of hunting, the Aboriginals invented some labour-saving technology. These included devices like the spear thrower and the throwing stick which made sure that the energy gained form eating the food was greater than the energy used in hunting for it.Spear throwerA spear thrower is a stick used to help propel the spear with greater force for a longer time. The basic design of the spear thrower was alike in many indigenous groups, though they called it different things. In New South Wales it was known as the Woomera, and in Western Australia, a Mirr. Spear throwers are made out of hard wood and usually 45cm to 50cm long. There is a carefully shaped handle at one end, and a hook-like peg at the other end where the butt end of the spear fits in. Using a spear thrower, you can get two to three times the distance you could throw without using one.Depending on where it was developed, the shape of the spear thrower varies. Modification of the shape lets the spear be able to be used for other purposes, such as a water scoop, a digging stick or a simple axe.Spear throwers work according to the principle of levers. It uses two levers to launch the spear. Both levers act as speed multipliers, increasing the speed of the spear compared to the speed of the thrower's arm.The first lever has its load at the hand and its fulcrum at the shoulder, as shown in diagram 1-3. This is the natural throwing lever of the arm and would be the normal lever, have the spear thrower not be used.Diagram 3 indicates the second lever coming into action. The fulcrum is complex and involves the shoulder, hand, and the hook-like point where the spear attaches to the spear thrower.For the spear thrower to be used effectively, as the arm reaches the normal release point (like when you're...

Find Another Essay On Australian Aboriginal Technology

Integration of Indigenous Knowledge and the Physical Sciences

3871 words - 15 pages understand their reactions.REFERENCEAikenhead, G.S. (1997).Toward a First Nations Cross-cultural Science and Technology Curriculum. Science Education, 81, 217-238.Aikenhead Glen, Bente Huntley. (1999). Teachers' Views on Aboriginal Students Learning Western and Aboriginal Science. Canadian Journal of Native Education, Vol. 23, pp. 159-175http://capes.usask.ca/ccstu/welcome.htmlAssembly of First Nations. (1990). Towards Linguistic Justice for First

The Stolen Genreations- Tells the story of the Aboriginal stolen generations in Australia.

756 words - 3 pages apology by the prime minister as well as a national effort should be made to reunite these children with their Aboriginal parents.The Australian Government on the other hand, argues that the policy was the only thing that saved the Aborigines from extinction. Technically, this is true, as research has shown that many other native tribes in other parts of the world who could not match the population size and technology of invading colonies usually

New Media Influence in Indegenous Communities

889 words - 4 pages identifying the key elements giving each place its special cultural significance that an Aboriginal group identifies within their tribal boundaries. (Gard and Salvatore 2005) While Traditional virtual heritage reconstructions are frequently dependent on technology and their development mostly driven by it, Digital Songlines is dependent firstly on an understanding of the traditional cultural values attached to specific landscape by Aboriginal people

The 'typical Australian' and indeed, Australian national identity, does not cover the diversity of Australian citizens and many groups, including women, are excluded.

1422 words - 6 pages happy nuclear family" (Whitlock, G; Carter, D; p135).The above examples of the 'typical Australian' are at the exclusion of many groups of Australian citizens: Aboriginal Australians, Australians of ethnic origin and women as a whole. In examining the exclusion of women, it is argued by Linzi Murrie "...that masculine is always positioned against an excluded 'feminine' or 'non-masculine' so that any masculinity is defined as much as by what it

The Effects of European Immigration on Australian Aboriginal Culture

2714 words - 11 pages time the ancestors of the Aborigines were thought to have made their way to Australia. This still left large expanses of open water that had to be crossed- up to 100 km- indicating that these people had developed some sort of sea-faring technology long before any other people. The Aboriginal culture is thought to be the oldest continuous culture still surviving today. It was traditionally a nomadic hunter-gatherer society, with intimate

The importance the majority culture place on the values of the minority culture determines how that culture lives within society. Discuss concerning Aboriginal Australia.

3049 words - 12 pages firmer grasp on the Australian community. This was one of their initial steps of "cloning" the Aboriginal culture to become that of their own. The customs that they endorsed were being implemented into the country that originally belonged to the Aborigines. The majority culture was now in control of the minority culture. The rules and regulations of the majority culture now had to be abided by the minority culture. The Aboriginal people who had

Population Health and Aboriginal Homicide

3929 words - 16 pages they tackle in partnership include tobacco control which is a big headache in Australia among the indigenous people, pandemic preparedness, diet improvement, improvement in physical activity, laboratory strengthening, prevention of avoidable blindness and surveillance and control of avian influenza (Australian Government. UsAID, 2011). World health organization has been in the forefront fighting for the health of the Aboriginal communities. Some

Branding Nationality

1167 words - 5 pages conveying Australia as a nation populated with women, as a nation that allows for people to experience an amalgam of cultures under the umbrella of a unified democracy, (Aerisu 2012) as a nation whereby people live in the city, in modern houses and use up-to-date technology. The Bushman stereotype, perpetuated through a range of iconic texts, informs a fabricated insight into the Australian identity; detrimental to both its manifesting cultural

Values and Attitudes Surrouding Australian Life that are Expressed in Tim Winton's 'Cloudstreet'

2174 words - 9 pages degrading, is seen as acceptable. Cloudstreet shows the difference that 50 years has made to Australian society where gambling is concerned. Increases in resources and technology have lead Australians away from frowning upon the more traditional forms of gambling (such as betting on the horse races), and concentrating their discrepancies more on gambling which is not associated with sport or any form of enjoyment, but rather just winning money

Essay on "Cloudstreet", by Tim Winton

2177 words - 9 pages as degrading, is seen as acceptable. Cloudstreet shows the difference that 50 years has made to Australian society where gambling is concerned. Increases in resources and technology have lead Australians away from frowning upon the more traditional forms of gambling (such as betting on the horse races), and concentrating their discrepancies more on gambling which is not associated with sport or any form of enjoyment, but rather just winning

"How well does Canberra, as the capitol, represent the history, culture and aspirations of Australia and Australians? "

915 words - 4 pages , ranging from Aborigine Art of the dreamtime and priceless antique paintings at the National Gallery of Australia to Questacon Australia's leading interactive science and technology Centre. The capitol of Australia also is the home of The High Court, which is the highest court in the Australian judicial system.Regarded as one of the most impressive war museums in the world, The Australian War Memorial and traces the history of Australia's fighting

Similar Essays

How Is There Animals Here? Essay

6447 words - 26 pages books.Verran, H. and Christie, M. (2007). Using/designing technologies of representation in Aboriginal Australian knowledge practices. In Human Technology: An interdisciplinary journal on humans in ICT environments, 3(2), 214-227. PAGE 2

Australian Government Policy Essay

3678 words - 15 pages . Australians then developed their own policies on how to deal with the Aborigines, which, as you can expect, bettered their own way of life. There are three historical phases of Australian governmental policies: dispossession, segregation, and assimilation. There are also some recent policies that have acknowledged Aboriginal rights and have increased their autonomy and welfare. This paper will discuss these phases, their effects on the Aborigines and

The 1967 Referendum Essay

3855 words - 15 pages constitution, have power to make laws for peace, order and good government of the Commonwealth with respect to… (xxvi) the people of any race, other than the aboriginal race in any State, for whom it is deemed necessary to make special laws". The common perception of the 1967 referendum is that it changed the position of the Aboriginal people in Australian society.4 Although the referendum did establish a new structure of more equal law-making

Referendum 1967 Essay

2882 words - 12 pages race in any State, for whom it is deemed necessary to make special laws". The common perception of the 1967 referendum is that it changed the position of the Aboriginal people in Australian society.[4] Although the referendum did establish a new structure of more equal law-making by including the Aboriginal people in general legislation like all other Australian citizens, it was changes to acts and political institutions that were made both before