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Background Of The Catholic Church Essay

4458 words - 18 pages

Background

In the Western world, the schism within the Catholic Church has made its most significant impact due to rapid changes in social standards. Of greatest importance is the evolution of modern society and their response to the reverberated traditions of the Catholic Church as well as the evolving Protestant sects. In consequence of increases in technology and science, modern society has redefined its acceptable and moral behavioral standards within a social setting, whereas, the Catholic Church stands firm in its doctrines despite social and moral movements in the twentieth century. Except for the Second Vatican Council and the Council of Trent, the Roman Catholic Church has not worked to revise its religious traditions in response to a changing society. As a consequence with this unparalleled development, many young adults and the population in general has swayed from the devout Catholic worship.1

From my personal experience I have found it difficult to accept the strict doctrines of the Catholic Church due to a social lifestyle that takes precedent. Secondly, I have appreciation for other religions, particularly Hinduism and sects within Christianity. My attitude does not necessarily correspond with that of the Catholic Church. Specifically, the Catholic Church perceives itself as the only divine route to Heaven. From my perspective, having been born and raised Catholic, I feel that Catholicism strongly disfavors any exploration of other religions or even tolerance of additional religions. I feel that this intolerance is subtly communicated to worshipers. Even if this intolerance it not communicated, there are not measures taken to inform worshipers about other religious practices. This stance is probably partially due to financial interests of the parish. This is dangerous because it hinders people from exploring realms that may encourage their spiritual and personal growth, in addition to development as a human being amidst an ever-evolving society. I don’t believe that religious conversions need to take place, rather religious communication and understanding. The intolerance perpetuated by Catholicism is a feeling that I had at one point entertained in accordance with my Church’s attitude. It is only now, after exploring other religious services, I realize the ignorance that intolerance perpetuates and I have grown spiritually from this revelation.

Upon these grounds I propose that it is reasonable and necessary to draw parallels between Protestant and Catholic religious services as a start to narrow the gap between Catholics and Protestants. It is in this acknowledgment of apparent similarities in worship that Protestants and Catholics would be able to appreciate each other for what they believe both religiously and socially. Whether or not people realize this point, religion even while separated from the state, influences how each individual approaches and interacts with another. The split between religion...

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