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The Man At 221 B Baker Street

2107 words - 9 pages

221B Baker Street: Rough Draft

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle was born, May 22, 1859 (wikipedia.com). He “was, in fact, one of the most fascinating and complex people of his age. He was an adventurer, a scientist and physician, a crusader for an eclectic and often unpopular set of causes, a deeply spiritual lapsed Catholic, a loyal and faithful husband who waited until after his wife’s death to marry the woman he really loved, and an incredibly versatile writer not only of detective fiction but also of science fiction and fantasy, horror, historical fiction, political tomes and polemics” (Womack 1-2).
Doyle became an amazing author. He wrote “twenty-one novels and over 150 short stories. He also published nonfiction, essays, articles, memoirs and three volumes of poetry” (http://www.victorianweb.org/authors/doyle/bio2.html). He received his love for stories from his mother, Mary Doyle. She had a huge love for books and would read him stories in such a beautiful and sweet tone (http://www.sherlockholmesonline.org/Biography/index.htm). She also made him read chivalric romances and Wild West stories, which Doyle’s favorite book at the time was The Scalp Hunters (1851). As his mind progressed in the world of reading, as an adult he wanted to create stories of his own (http://dickens.stanford.edu/sherlockholmes/biography/biography.html).
Doyle was forced into a medical career by his mother. He agreed not because he was passionate about the subject, but he knew it was a well-paying job. His father, a middle-class man, was a strong alcoholic, and was eventually put into an asylum. (http://www.sherlockholmesonline.org/Biography/index.htm). This left Doyle and his mother with less money to pay for Doyle’s medical classes.
During school Doyle enjoyed lectures at the crowded lecture halls, more so that doing homework or classwork. He also enjoyed the presence one of his teachers, Dr. Joseph Bell. Dr. Bell would always know something about someone just by looking at their clothing or hands. Dr. Bell gave Doyle the inspiration to Sherlock Holmes. (http://dickens.stanford.edu/sherlockholmes/biography/biography2.html)
Doyle became amazing at medicine he would hire assistance and travel to help people across the world, he would write stories on his travel. Later on he couldn’t continue to practice medicine due to money issues. Eventually, he would marry a woman that he met on his medical travels and her name was Louise Hawkins, she helped him get through his financial problems by providing him with money she had, and raising his standard of living (http://dickens.stanford.edu/sherlockholmes/biography/biography2.html).
After a while Doyle realized that while working on a story called The American Tale. He thought he could sell his writings, "It was in this year that I first learned that shillings might be earned in other ways than by filling phials" (http://www.sherlockholmesonline.org/Biography/biography3.htm). Years later after he was more financially secure, he...

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