"Beat! Beat! Drums!" By Walt Whitman.

967 words - 4 pages

Analysis of Imagery"Beat! Beat! Drums!"The Civil War had a major impact on the people of America through the years of 1861 to 1865. Walt Whitman, a poet and Northerner of this time, wanted to capture the people's reactions of the war after finding out it was not going to end as quickly as they had anticipated. Whitman illustrated how the people, especially Northerners, changed throughout this conflict; he achieved this by using countless images in his poem, "Beat! Beat! Drums!" The main focus of the piece was imagery, which intensified the reader's perceptions and reinforced their emotions of the war. By emphasizing the significance of images, Walt Whitman went from being a public poet to breaking away from the traditional poetic form and introducing new kinds of poetry to America. Whitman's dedicated spirit helped him expand his sense of imagery through his various works, since he was never able to attend college. The imagery in Whitman's poem that portrayed the Civil War could be evaluated by concentrating on the frequency and types of images, frames of reference and suitability of the imagery, and the meaning and effect of the images.Walt Whitman used an extensive amount of images throughout his poem that primarily appealed to the senses of sight and sound. There was imagery all throughout the poem to reinforce the meaning of the war and immense influence this struggle had on the lives of the people. One significant sight image was "the solemn church" (Whitman. 3). This line helped establish the serious tone of the work. Whitman chose another picture of the town to illustrate how the clatter of the war spread through the hustle and bustle of everyday activity: "Over the traffic of cities--over the rumble of wheels in the streets;" (9). It further supported Walt Whitman's belief that these war sounds interrupted the harmony of people's lives. Whitman used the sounds of war as an audible image to demonstrate its effects on the common people. Right at the start, he acknowledged the drums and bugles when he wrote, "Beat! beat! drums!--blow! bugles! blow!" which emphasized the significance of them. (1) Walt Whitman, nonetheless, brought in the sounds of war at the beginning and end of every section to ensure the reader had a feeling that the drums were never ending.Whitman's poem consisted of several kinds of images that carried out the many feelings about this time of conflict. The two dissimilar categories that partially made up Whitman's poem were power and peace. The sounds of the drums and bugles traveled "through the windows-through doors-burst like a ruthless force," (2) as if they were shattering through the homes of the common people. In the beginning Whitman used imagery to show how the intensity of the drums and bugles broke up everyday life. Another image of power was, "So...

Find Another Essay On "Beat! Beat! Drums!" by Walt Whitman.

A Critical Review of "Leaves of Grass" By Walt Whitman

1728 words - 7 pages 1 A Critical Review of "Leaves of Grass" By Walt Whitman Masoud Shahnazari Azad University of Kerman Instructor: Dr. Khozaei Introduction Walter Whitman, the poet known as the American bard was born in West Hills, Long Island in New York on May 31, 1819. His mother, Louisa, immigrated from Holland and his father, Walter, from England. Whitman's father worked mostly with his hands as a carpenter and a house builder and Whitman himself would

Emotions in O Captain! My Captain!" by Walt Whitman

1175 words - 5 pages The poem, "O Captain! My Captain!" by Walt Whitman re-imagines the assassination of Abraham Lincoln by using emotions filled with shock and regret of losing a father figure. Walt Whitman has a patriotic attitude towards this poem as he describes Abraham Lincoln and all that he did for America by using imagery to develop a scene similar to the reality. The poet conveys his deep admiration for the achievements of Abraham Lincoln. Whitman shares

Identities and Transcendentalism in Song of Myself by Walt Whitman

1055 words - 4 pages Identities and Transcendentalism in Song of Myself While reading through the poem Song of Myself by Walt Whitman, what comes to your mind? His deep love for nature? The use of symbolism throughout the poem? Whitman’s questionable homoeroticism that seeps its way throughout the lines? What came to the forefront of mind when reading this poem by Whitman was his deliberately obvious theme of individuality while also maintaining a universal

Egalitarianism in The Leaves of Grass by Walt Whitman

1234 words - 5 pages Within Walt Whitman’s works he expresses his egalitarianism or belief in the equality of all people, especially in political, social, or economic life in his epic book called the leaves of grass. His strong point of view in the poem I Sing the Body Electric is expressed through sexuality, body attributes, political views. In the poem of I sing the body electric Walt Whitman expresses many qualities upon the body. It is as if he almost prizes

I Sit and Look Out by Walt Whitman

1056 words - 4 pages Every historical period has its own hero of the time. It can be an active businessman or a sensitive aristocrat that fits the time best. In the poem I Sit and Look Out, Walt Whitman describes the horrors of the oppressive age he was living in. However, he does not try to change the situation and only "sits and look out". The question is whether being a spectator is enough to make the life of the oppressed better. The author is the mirror of the

A Poem Analysis: "A Noiseless Patient Spider" by Walt Whitman

1640 words - 7 pages Only attending school until the age of eleven and living in Long Island, this man became one of our nation's most honored poets (Poetry Criticism). Walt Whitman was born in 1819 in Long Island (Poetry Criticism). He attended school there until the age of eleven, after which he worked as a clerk in a law office (Poetry Criticism). At the age of thirty-five he published his first edition of Leaves of Grass which he would be constantly revising

"The Rolling Stone Book of the Beats": The Beat Generation and American Culture, Edited by Holly George-Warren

4000 words - 16 pages chapter looks at those who have continued to carry on the legacy of the Beats.Given the possible problems of a long anthology, and the impulsive nature of the Beat culture, the writing here is incredibly refined as it is innovative. Most importantly, the book serves as a true celebration of beat culture as well as a historical narrative on the movement itself.Part 1: The Birth of Beat"The City Where the Beats were Moved to Howl" by Ann Douglas.Ann

"So now you're dancing to a different beat!" narrative about a boy being threatened by a gang at gun point

881 words - 4 pages “So now you’re dancing to a different beat!” he exclaimed with his strong European accent. His fiery eyes staring deep into mine with a cheeky smirk on his face suggesting that he found it humorous or somewhat like a game, that he could scare and force a young naive adolescent into doing something against his own will. I looked down at his metallic black hand gun clenched firmly in his tight grip, pointing directly between my two

I picked some of my favorite lines in "Song of Myself" by Walt Whitman and decided to write about them

760 words - 3 pages Untitled Walt Whitman, a Great American Poet Walt Whitman was among the most influential poets in American. His works boldly emphasize the worth of the individual. When I first began to read some of his poems in the packet "Song of Myself," by Walt Whitman, these are the lines that intrigued me: "I celebrate myself, and sing myself, And what I assume, you shall assume, For every atom belonging to me as good belongs to

This is essay is comparing and contrasting I, too sing america by langston hughes and i hear america singing by walt whitman

709 words - 3 pages Essay: Write a two-page essay in which you compare any two out of the four Walt Whitman and Langston Huges poems. What do they have in common? How are they different? Use specific examples from the text to prove your point.Poems: I, too, sing America by Langston Hughes & I hear America Singing by Walt WhitmanToday, we know, that a poem can best be described as a verbal composition designed to convey experiences, ideas, or emotions in a very

Turn The Beat Around" P.22-56 by Peter Shapiro

800 words - 3 pages had their unique terminology and even esoteric philosophy based on the belief that the whites were genetically engineered by a black scientist. Referring to this theory, Jackson also marks out the Five Percent Nation as the hip-hop fans, who could be marked out as the representatives with their special beliefs in the sanctity of the black Americans. In such a way, the young people followed the new spiritual teaching taught through hip-hop lyrics

Similar Essays

Leaves Of Grass By Walt Whitman

1493 words - 6 pages Leaves of Grass by Walt Whitman In the twentieth century, the name Walt Whitman has been synonymous with poetry. Whitman's most celebrated work, Leaves of Grass, was the only book he ever wrote, and he took a lifetime to write it. A large assortment of poems, it is one of the most widely criticized works in literature, and one of the most loved works as well. Whitman was unmarried and childless, and it has been noted that Leaves of Grass

Song Of Myself By Walt Whitman

1627 words - 7 pages In his first anthology of poems entitled “Song of Myself”, Walt Whitman reveals some of his views on democracy through the use of symbolism and free verse poetry. His use of symbolism and free verse poetry creates indeterminacy, giving the reader hints rather than answers about the nature of the poem. In the sixth part of “Song of Myself”, a child asks the narrator of the poem, “What is the grass?” (Whitman). Instead of simply giving an answer

Leaves Of Grass By Walt Whitman

2900 words - 12 pages production (Pascal, 47). When Walt Whitman began publishing Leaves of Grass, America teetered at the edge of a great chasm created by social and economic crisis; slavery and capitalism its progenitor. Undoubtedly this time called for great poets and visionaries to usher in the change necessary to endure those bleak, catastrophic times. In retrospect readers and critics, especially confederate apologists, can look at Whitman and undermine his

"Crossing Brooklyn Ferry" By Walt Whitman

876 words - 4 pages "Crossing Brooklyn Ferry" by Walt Whitman Recurring Images and Motifs in "Crossing Brooklyn Ferry" In the poem "Crossing Brooklyn Ferry" by Walt Whitman, there are many recurring images and motifs that can be seen. Whitman develops these images throughout the course of the poem. The most dominant of these are the linear notion of time, playing roles, and nature. By examining these motifs and tracing their development