Becoming American: Maintaining Identity Essay

821 words - 3 pages

America is made up of every nationality on this planet. There is at least one person of each race and nationality on this continent. Immigrants impact our way of life more than we really know. America is assimilation and a multiculturalism collection of this world’s people.
     When the Americas were first discovered, it was just mere occasions where a fisherman had landed in the Americas and was not aware of what he had found. The actual finding that this was a new continent was monumental. New people, ideas and religion soon started to spread.
     America would not be what it is today if it wasn’t for all of the emigrants that moved here back in the 1500s up until now. This county was founded by people who left their own country and move here with ideas of freedom, prosperity, and the adventure of a new life. This same dream still continues on to today.
     Thought history emigrants have worked had at some of the worst jobs imaginable, jobs that still need to get done. At the same time we have emigrants that are excellent surgeons, from all over the world, here to save lives; we have scientists from all over the world coming together for the good of the entire human race.
     Up until the Americas it seems one countries opinion, ideas, and inventions were not widely shared, but America seems to be the hub in linking all the countries and the minds of this world. America is seen as a place where your opinion does matter, and people will accept you, to some extent. Every culture, and or group of people has contributed something of importance to America. Some of the peoples that have migrated here have been treated horribly in the past but with a culture built out of “the people choice”, it leaves no room for separation or segregation of people.
     Take for instance the Chinese, Chinese Immigration effects present times in America because of how they now succeed in modern society when in the past we would not even let them become American citizens. The first Chinese immigrated to the United States in the 1600’s. It was thought that in the past that since they were not white and the fact that they were never slaves to us meant that there was no need for them to be naturalized.
The Chinese traveled to the US in the time of the gold rush because they needed to come...

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