Beverly Cleary Books Essay

1156 words - 5 pages

Theme: Author, Beverly Cleary Audience: Parents of elementary aged students Cleary, Beverly. Henry and Beezus. New York: Morrow Junior Books, 1952. Henry and Beezus is the 8th book in Cleary's series of over 30 books written about adventures and lessons for young children. Throughout this particular book, Henry has to over come many obstacles and problems not only with the help of others, but by himself as well and does so wonderfully. Henry has to deal with situations such as finding 49 boxes full of 300 bubble gum balls in each in a vacant lot, to Ribsy, Henry's dog, grabbing the neighbors roast off the grill. You can see how Henry learns responsibility and companionship during his journeys with his dog Ribsy and his friend Beatrice, also known as Beezus by her kid sister Ramona. Teachers might use this book to exemplify the responsibility Henry portrays; for example, always having his dog with him and not leaving the duties of having a pet to his parents, or trying to raise money for a new bike. Instead of waiting until his next birthday or Christmas, Henry tries to get it himself. This book could also be used for discussion purposes with your children for "right" and "wrong", for example, how Scooter is always gambling and getting himself into troubled situations.Cleary, Beverly. Muggie Maggie. New York: Morrow Junior Books, 1990. Muggie Maggie is the 19th book in Cleary's series of children's books. In this book Maggie, a third grade girl is learning the pressures of being a student that doesn't always want to do what the class is doing; in this case, cursive writing. The teachers along with her parents, classmates, and principal try many ways to get Maggie's interest in this process and almost trick her into learning it. By writing about Maggie in cursive to other teachers, she becomes almost intrigued to find out what the teachers are saying about her, this is when Maggie finally learns to write cursive. Parents don't always understand the influence they have over their children's learning styles and habits. If children see how parents relate to certain topics then perhaps the children will mimic, in a way, to what they see their roll models, their parents and teachers doing/thinking/feeling. Maggie's interest about what was being said about her made her work harder. Sometimes when children know things are being said about them or good things are being said that they don't know makes them work harder or want to try to better themselves. Maggie shows effort as she practices very hard and very often, this is another reason this book could have a good influence on children in elementary school.Cleary, Beverly. Dear Mr. Henshaw. New York: William Morrow and Company, 1983. Dear Mr. Henshaw is the second book in Cleary's series about a boy, Leigh Botts, pen pals an author he enjoys reading, first in second grade, then again in third, fourth, fifth, sixth and that's where most of the letters are written from....

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