Beyond what meets the eye in Poe's Horror Tale

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In “The Fall of the House of Usher,” by Edgar Allan Poe the paragraphs at the beginning, really sets the mood to rest of the story and is pretty effective for what is to come. The mood is creepy, sinister, and horror type, both in the sound and words, helping create this atmosphere. It does this by using very complex and gloomy vocabulary. The author exaggerated this story to show a problem that people all have within them. Which in this case, is that one has madness inside them.
The narrator went to Rodrick's Ushers house in pity after receiving a letter from him. Once the narrator arrives he spends most of the time describing the house as having a feeling of, “iciness, a sinking, a sickening of the heart” (1553). However, as the narrator goes inside, his views of the house worsens, “An air of stern, deep, and irredeemable gloom hung over and pervaded all”(1555), of the house. Afterward, he meets Rodrick Usher who start babbling nonsense, “I feel that I must inevitably abandon life and reason together in my struggles with some fatal demon of fear”(1556). This is the first sign of madness, the narrator now believes a mental illness in which Mr. Usher has, “superstitious impressions in regard to the dwelling which he tenanted”(1556). In reality though his family only married each other which was incest. Nevertheless, they later started dying, most likely because they were making a family with their blood. Which is not good for new born who could have been mutated through the process. Back in that time though, that type of information was not known, so Mr. Usher believed it to be a cursed which the narrator found ironic. Thus, insanity is introduced in the story through Rodrick Usher who the narrator believes to be mentally ill.
As days passed, the narrator tries to cheer up Mr. Usher, regardless he failed to do so. One of...

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