Biblical Autobiography, Part 3 Essay

1016 words - 4 pages - by billiardsdrill ✓ Expert Reviewed

As time has progressed, this class has unexpectedly grown on me. After truly believing with every fiber of my being that there wasn’t anything more I could get by taking this class, I’m happy (and rather shocked) to say that I’m wrong. The continued exploration of the Bible throughout this semester has been exhilarating, eye-opening, and even at times, confusing. Nonetheless, these are to be expected when delving deep into the word of the Lord.
Since God allowed me to born into an ideal Christian family, I’ve always known about the Bible and what it teaches. Growing up, I went to church on Sunday mornings and followed along during the sermon. I made it my personal goal to be the best little girl sitting in the pews, and more importantly, to be the best example of a Christian out there. I thought this was made possible by adamantly reading the Bible. I was wrong and this was a problem. It was a problem because all I was doing was reading the Bible. Sure, in the grand scheme of things this sounds great, but I never took any of it to heart. The reality was I was reading passively and only getting the bare minimum out it. This has all changed since the beginning of this semester and even since writing my second autobiography. As I stated in that autobiography, my thoughts and feelings on the Bible haven’t changed only my overall outlook. This still holds true. The thing that has merged or shifted is how I look at the Bible as a whole. I no longer read it passively but instead make a conscious effort to read and understand the fine details along with the main points. It’s with this I’ve been able to change my viewpoint on how much more there is to God and his relationship with the world.
Up to this point, the thing I found my surprising or unexpected is how much I didn’t know about the historical context of the Bible. When starting to read the New Testament I felt comfortable with it all. I thought I had a better understanding on this section of the Bible in relation to that of the Old Testament. I was wrong. I was surprised to learn that many books of the New Testament got their names from towns during that time period and that many of them were actually letters to the people of those towns. I was also surprised to find out learn that there are two different types of gospels. With that, I didn’t know Matthew, Mark, and Luke were considered synoptic gospels while John was in a category all of its own. This more than surprised me, it interested me! From my passive readings, I had never looked at the gospels as separate books, but rather, as four books together that showed the life of Christ on earth up to his ascension into heaven. After being able to look at them separately and compare them as a whole, I was then able...

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