Bill Of Rights: Four Freedoms Essay

1519 words - 6 pages

The first amendment of the Bill of Rights to the constitution guarantees four freedoms: freedom of religion, speech, press and assembly. The Bill of Rights was passed on December 15, 1791. Since then, the freedoms have been debated, discussed, and fought and died for. Many have immigrated to America to receive those freedoms. The Founding Fathers knew what they were doing because they believed in power of ideas and debate, not censorship. The first amendment to the constitution is important because it prohibits congress from establishing an official religion in the U.S., gives Americans the freedom to say what is on their minds, and gives the right to petition and assemble peacefully.The First Amendment of the Constitution of the United States gives every individual the same rights. One right is the constitutional protection for the free exercise of religion. The second right is prohibition of the establishment of religion by the state. The founders of the constitution recognized the freedom of religion as an important factor in establishing a democracy. They also recognized a space of freedom between the government and the people, whereby the government could not force an individual or group to do something they did not want to do. The government is not upholding their part of the constitution. They are trying to tell people that saying prayer in public school is unconstitutional.In fact, prayer in public school is legal, so is prayer in church and prayer in stores etc. The area which is not legal is when students or teachers pray when engaged in school activities or instruction. This means students or teachers may pray in an informal setting, such as cafeterias and hallways. They may talk about and discuss problems with religion and their beliefs at that time. A person may come to school early and sit quietly and pray. With the permission of the school a group of students could establish a prayer club. All these things are legal, but what the government is trying to avoid is mandatory school prayer. Mandatory school prayer is illegal and violates the constitution. It would contradict all separation between church and state. If prayer in public school was made necessary the country would most likely be divided. You would have the religious leader ecstatic about the freedom of prayer. Then you would have offended non-believers or believer of other denominations or people who find the government too controlling. With legalization of prayer, would come disruption in the way the government is run. Whereby the beliefs of an individual, like the president or a member of congress, would set goals using feelings and not thinking through the problem. For example, a president with strong religious beliefs would be against anything dealing with moral issues. The ideals of an individual would then be imposed on another. Also the government, in giving permission to a prayer in school, would imply that one religion was better than the another. This could be...

Find Another Essay On Bill of Rights: Four Freedoms

The Bill of Rights Essay

788 words - 3 pages The Bill of Rights is the essence of American freedoms, and is what makes the United States original among the other nations and governments of the world (Bradley, 2004). The first Amendment gives us several freedoms, including the freedom of speech, so in this paper I will take a closer look at the freedom of speech in the first amendment.The Bill Of RightsBefore we go to the freedom of speech, lets take a quick look at where and when it

The Bill of Rights Essay

1663 words - 7 pages fundamental freedoms “is to be subjected to a more exacting judicial scrutiny… than most other types of legislation” (Ginsberg, Lowi, Shepsle, and Ansolabehre 2012) This shows how important the freedom of speech and freedom of the press is the having civil liberties and rights, by the emphasis the Supreme Court put on protecting it. The next few amendments, two through four limit the president or the executive branch. The main parts of these

Bill of Rights

1724 words - 7 pages fact that the President could make this assurance the year before the passage of the First Amendment indicates that to a certain degree the Bill of Rights was clearly reflecting and perserve existing practice. Of course, the amendments were added only four years after the passage of the original Constitution. Labunski notes that, to a certain degree, Madison proposed them in order to defuse the complaints about that original document which

The Bill of Rights

1509 words - 6 pages Introduction The Bill of Rights was created because the states believed that the federal government would have too much power and they wanted to have more individual rights. Around this time the colonies had just been under the British rule, which oppressed the people and give them very limited freedoms. The states or the colonies were kind of afraid that this would happen all over again within this new government forming in the form of the

The Bill of Rights

780 words - 4 pages The Bill of Rights is the name that we give to the first ten amendments to our Constitution. These first ten amendments were necessary to get the holdover states in the Union to ratify the Constitution. This piece of legislation is what gave us our most important individual rights such as freedom of speech and religion. It was not an easy road however and there was fierce debate from both sides about whether it should be included or not. In this

The Bill of Rights

1354 words - 5 pages Bill of Rights We live in the 21st century, where most Americans mind their own business but take for granted our God given rights. Not only God given rights but also those established by our founding forefathers. This paper will illustrate and depict the importance of the original problems faced when adopting the Constitution and the Bill of Rights. It will discuss the importance of the first amendment, the due process of the 4th, 5th, 6th

The Bill of Rights - 1787 words

1787 words - 8 pages From the time it was first proposed in 1789, the Bill of Rights was controversial. The founding fathers had already considered adding a Bill of Rights in the original 1787 Constitution, mainly because they knew the people feared a powerful central government and formally stating their rights in this new document would appease them. They did not add it, however, thinking it was not really necessary. Each state had their own version of a Bill

Canada’s Charter of Rights and Freedoms

1294 words - 5 pages and freedoms. The Charter also effectively protects rights of Canadians in prison. The Charter of Rights and Freedoms doesn’t allow the government to pass any laws that violate the Charter of Rights and Freedoms. For any bill in the Canadian legislature to become a law, it must go to the Supreme Court of Canada. The bill is analyzed by the Supreme Court of Canada and is only made into a law after the seven judges of the Supreme Court decide it

HOA Bill of Rights

1098 words - 4 pages finds themselves in the middle of this. Most people are unable to buy elsewhere because most cities and counties have now mandated that most new housing be in homeowner associations, he feels very unfree in the land of the free.I would like to see a Homeowner’s Bill of Rights. Most States laws are created in favor of the homeowner associations. To balance the scale a Homeowner Bill of Rights would secure the homeowner from foreclosure from

The Bill Of Rights

4028 words - 16 pages Bill of RightsHow many rights do you have? You should check, because it might not be as many todayas it was a few years ago, or even a few months ago. Some people I talk to are notconcerned that police will execute a search warrant without knocking or that they set uproadblocks and stop and interrogate innocent citizens. They do not regard these as greatinfringements on their rights. But when you put current events together, there is

Bill Of Rights

581 words - 2 pages My Favorite Bill of Rights After I read the U.S. Constitution my favorite section was the Bill of Rights. If we did not have these Amendments our country would be a big fight between each other. Because most of the amendments protects each person to have the right to a trial or protects our country and gives it peace. After I read all the amendments the ones I liked the most were Amendment 13. Slavery Abolished (1865), Amendment

Similar Essays

A Comparison Of Us Bill Of Rights And The Canadian Charter Of Rights And Freedoms

1901 words - 8 pages Former United States Attorney General Ramsey Clark wrote in the New York Times, "A right is not what someone gives you; but what no one can take away." It is in this vein that a country drafts legislation to protect the rights of their inhabitants. In the United States there is the Bill of Rights, which consists of a preamble and the first ten amendments to the United States Constitution, 1787 . The Charter of Rights and Freedoms is the first

Charter Of Rights And Freedoms Essay

2032 words - 8 pages (1) The Charter protects a range of rights and freedoms, but these rights often conflict. In some instances, courts are called upon to weigh competing rights. In your opinion, is freedom of religion or freedom of expression more important? Why? Use case law examples to support and defend your argument. The Charter of rights and freedoms focuses on many fundamental rights of individual, but often these rights conflict with one another. When

Bill Of Rights Essay

1128 words - 5 pages The Bill of Rights is an important part in our everyday lives because it gives us many of the freedoms we have. It is historically important because it shaped the people’s rights. The Bill of Rights affects everyone, including myself. It gives me rights if I were to get arrested and it gives me my freedom to what religion I practice. The Bill of Rights protects our freedoms, and to prove this I will explain its history, give information about

The Bill Of Rights Essay 1627 Words

1627 words - 7 pages collectively were called The Bill of Rights. The Bill of Rights protected the freedoms of assembly, speech, religion, the press, and to petition the government to address grievances; the right to bear arms, guaranteed speedy trial, prohibition of illegal search and seizure, and no quartering of troops in private homes without the owner’s consent. Other amendments dealt with legal procedures (152). When The Bill of Rights was written the abuses that the